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ANNUAL REPORT 
TOWN OF IPSWICH 






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Yacht Club Pier foreground; Plum Island Sound background; by Phillip 
M. Charette, 1 Bush Hill Road. 



TOWN OF IPSWICH 

MASSACHUSETTS 




1978 ANNUAL REPORT 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



Roster of Town Officials and Committees ... 3 

Annual Town Meeting 9 

Operating Budget General Government .... 13 

Board of Selectmen 44 

Town Manager 45 

Assessors Office 45 

Building Inspector 46 

Cemetery Dept 46 

Civil Defense . 47 

Commuter Rail Committee 48 

Council on Aging 48 

Dog Officer 49 

Elec. Light Dept 50 

Essex County Mosquito Control Project. ... 51 

Fire Dept 52 

Government Study Com 52 

Harbors 53 

Health Dept 53 

Historical Comm 54 

Housing Authority 55 

Industrial Development Commission 57 

Police Dept 58 

Police Station Study Committee 58 

Public Library 59 



Public Works Dept 60 

Recreation - Parks Dept 63 

Ipswich School Committee 65 

Superintendent of Schools 66 

High School 69 

High School Graduates 69 

Ralph C. Whipple Memorial School '. . 71 

Doyan School 71 

Winthrop School 72 

Burley - Shatswell Schools 73 

Director of Curriculum 74 

Pupil Personnel Services 74 

Enrollment Charts 75 

Shellfish Dept 77 

Town Clerk 78 

Town Counsel 79 

Treasurer-Collector 80 

Veterans' Services 80 

Water/Sewer Dept 81 

Youth Commission 84 

Zoning Board of Appeals 85 

In Memoriam 86 

Ipswich at a Glance 88 



SI 



Ml 



Ml 



ROSTER OF TOWN OFFICIALS 
AND COMMITTEES 



ELECTED 



CONSTABLE 

Jeffrey H. Hardy 


1979 


FINANCE COMMITTEE 




Elected Al Town Meeting 




Lawrence J. Pszenny, Ch. 


1981 


Edward L. Nagus 


1979 


George H. W. Hayes 11 


1980 


Appointed By Moderator 




John Griffin 


1981 


William Craft 


1979 


Mary P. Conley 


1980 


Appointed By Selectmen 




Thomas Emery 


1979 


James D. Smyth 


1980 


John G. Markos 


1981 


HOUSING AUTHORITY 




Arthur Goodfellow, Ch. 


1979 


Jacqueline A. Boch 


1983 


Stanley Eustace 


1980 


Arthur B. Weagle 


1981 


James Carter/State 


1981 



E 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

Patricia Manning, Ch. 
Paul K. Gahm 
Walter J. Pojasek 
Thomas L. Moscarillo 
Deanna S. Cross 
Robert Abendroth 
Margot Sherwood 

BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

Edwin H. Damon, Jr., Ch. 
John M. Pickard 
John T. Beagan 
Arthur S. LeClair 
John A. Pechilis 

TOWN MODERATOR 

Harold E. Shively 



APPOINTED ADMINISTRATION 
TOWN ACCOUNTANT Ml HARBORMASTER 

Robert H. Leet 1979 John Costopoulos 



TOWN ASSESSOR 

VarnumS. Pedrick 1979 

BUILDING INSPECTOR 

Ralph Hebert 1979 



Ml HEALTH AGENT 

Deborah Johnson Stone 



Ml CEMETERY SUPERINTENDENT 

Walter H. Hulbert, Jr. 

Ml DOG OFFICER 

Melvin Blaquiere 1979 

SI ELECTRIC MANAGER 

Alfred Tobiasz 1979 

Ml TOWN ENGINEER 

James E. Chase 

Ml FIRE CHIEF 

Melvin Bowen 

Ml TOWN COUNSEL 

Charles C. Dalton 1979 

S TOWN MANAGER 

George E.Howe 1980 

HOUSING AUTHORITY 

Jane Bokron, Director 1982 



1980 
1981 
1979 
1979 
1980 
1981 
1981 



1980 
1979 
1981 
1981 
1980 



1979 



1979 



1980 



Ml LIBRARIAN 

Eleanor Crowley 

Ml POLICE CHIEF 

Armand Brouillette 

Ml PUBLIC WORKS DIRECTOR 

Armand T. Michaud 

Ml RECREATION-PARKS DIRECTOR 

James H.Daly 1980 

Ml SHELLFISH CONSTABLE 

Charles Gianakakis 1980 



Ml TOWN CLERK 

Harold G. Comeau 



198 



SI TREASURER/COLLECTOR 

George C. Mourikas 1980 

Ml YOUTH DIRECTOR 

Cathleen McGinley 



APPOINTED BOARDS AND COMMITI ELS 



M BOARD OF ASSESSORS 

Varnum S. Pcdrick 
William P. Lewis 
John D. Heaphy 

M CEMETERY COMMISSION 

Leon B. Turner, Ch. 
Nicholas Markos 
Gordon C. Player 

M ELECTRIC ADVISORY 
COMMITTEE 

Thomas A. Ercoline, Jr., Ch. 

Jet trey J. LaMarca 

John C. Smith 

Lawrence R. Sweetser 

John H. Ward 

William C. Middlebrooks 

Edward Kozeneski 

M CIVIL DEFENSE 

John R. Harrigan, Dir. 
Robert D. O'Meara, Assistant 



M6 



M 





Richard 1 Benedetto 


1980 


1979 


lames M Nelson 


1982 


1979 


Nathaniel Pulsifer 


1982 


1980 


S TRUST FUND COMMISSION 






Llton McCausland 


1980 


1979 


Sturgis P. Papagiotis 


1981 


1981 


Peter .1. Owsiak 


1979 


1980 







1981 
1981 
1981 
1979 
1979 
1980 
1980 



1979 
1979 



COMMUTER RAII 

Leland Carter, Ch. 
Harold F. Balch 
Cornelius Cleary 
James C. McManaway, Jr 
Robert K. Weatherall 
Dorcas Rice 
Peter R. Hull 
James Berry 



COMMITTEE 

1979 
1979 
1979 
1979 
1979 
1979 
1979 
1979 



CONSERVATION COMMISSION 

Jack B. Johnstone, Ch. 1980 

Carol Grimes 1981 

Pattie T.Hall 1981 

Sarah L. Weatherall 1979 

Costos Tsoutsouris 1979 

David R. Knowlton 1980 

JacobS. Hoffman 1979 

COUNCIL ON AGING 

Betty Pelham,Ch. 1979 

Virginia Cawthron Poulen 1981 

Helen Drenth 1981 

Percy Cheverie 1979 

Harold Bowen 1980 

Winfred Hardy 1980 

Catherine Cheverie 1981 

INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT 
COMMISSION 

Paul R. Beswick.Ch. 1983 

Peter W. Williamson 1979 

Alfred Castanini 1979 

Stephen L. Diet ch 1981 

Alfred Benedetto 1979 

Bruce I.Paul 1980 



Ml BELL RINGER 

Harold Bowen 



M 



M 



1979 



MOSQUITO CONTROL COMMITTEE 

Alice Keenan 1979 

Alice R. LaCount 1979 

Barbara Porter 1979 

Harold Balch 1979 

Herbert E. Brack 1979 

V. Bvron Bennett 1979 



PLANNING BOARD 

Roger A. Burke, Ch. 
Sarah L. Weatherall 
Jason A. Sokolov 
George R. Mathey 

GOVERNMENT STUDY 
COMMITTEE 

Boleslof S. Radzinski, Ch. 
Alice Trocki 
Sharon B. Walters 
Aristotelis S. Naoum 
Theodore F. Mozdziez 
Robert P. Vogel 
Jessie Girard 
George W. Rendle 
Carmen Q. Hebbel 



1982 
1980 
1979 
1981 



1979 
1979 
1979 
1979 
1979 
1979 
1979 
1979 
1979 



M BOARD OF HEALTH 

Paul J. Valcour, Ch. 1980 

William C. Wigglesworth, M.D. 1981 

Edward B. Marsh, M.D. 1979 

MI Deborah Johnson Stone, Agent 1980 

M6 HISTORICAL COMMISSION 

John F. Conley, Ch. 1979 

Barbara C. Emberley 1981 

Faith L. Bryan 1981 

George R. Nlathey 1981 

Lovcll Thompson 1979 

Alice Keenan 1979 

John C. Vincent. Jr. 1980 

S LIBRARY TRUSTEES 

Hubert A. Johnson. Ch. 1981 

Phyllis E. Bruce 1979 

Daniel W. Poor. Jr. 1981 

Alice Keenan 1981 

Kathryn G. Klinger 1979 

Ann Durev 1979 



Louise W.Sweetser 1980 

Rev. Robert Dobson 1980 

RaePaul 1980 
Ml Eleanor M. Crowley, Librarian 

S WATERWAYS STUDY COMMITLEE 



Robert D. Todd. Jr.Ch. 
Joseph A. Navarro 
Ruth S. Drown 
Bruce B. Bromby 
Costos Tsoutsouris 
John Beirne 

M YOUTH COMMISSION 

Louis P. GeotTrion, Ch. 
Fred Moon 
Maureen Perkins 
Charles H. Cooper 
Timothy Bishop 
Bro. Robert Russell 
Joanne Burns 
Ml Cathleen McGinley, Director 



1979 
1979 
1979 
1979 
1979 
1979 



1981 
1981 
1979 
1979 
1979 
1979 
1980 



S ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS 

James Theodosopoulos, Ch. 1982 

John Dragoni 1983 

William J. Murphy 1979 

Daniel B. Lunt, Jr. 1980 

Mary E. Fosdick 1981 

Robert E. Macklin/Alt. 1979 

John R. Verani/Alt. 1979 



M 



M 



M 



M 



M 



M 



SHELLFISH ADYISOKY BOARD 

Jeffrey M. Dolan.Ch. 1979 

Andrew Gianakakis 1979 

Thomas Dorman 1979 

Ernest 1 . Brockelbank 1979 

James I.Man 1979 

Philip Kent 1979 
Joseph 1 .eadvaro (Lauderowicz) 1979 

G AS INSPECTOR 

GlenWanzer 1979 

INSECT PEST CONTROL 
SUPERINTENDENT 

Armand Michaud 1979 

INSPECTOR OF ANIMALS 

Melvin Blaquiere 1979 

PLUMBING INSPECTOR 

A. N. D. Hyde 

ALTERNATE PLUMBING 
INSPECTOR 

Rene Rathe 

SEALER OF WEIGHTS & MEASURES 

Normand J. Bedard 



TREE WARDEN 

Armand Michaud 



1981 



05 POLICE STATION STUDY 
COMMITTEE 
Appointed By Selectmen 

George Mathey, Ch. 

Armand Brouillette 

Adele Robertson 

Appointed By Moderator 

Mary E. Williamson 

Roger A. Burke 

Appointed By Finance Committee 

Thomas Emery 

Edward L. Nagus 

M RECREATION & PARKS 
COMMITTEE 

John H. Morrow, Ch. 1979 

Elizabeth J. Geanakakis 1981 

Richard J. Caram 1981 

Thomas J. Flynn 1980 

• Charles J. Foley 1980 

James H. Daly, Director 1980 

S REGISTRARS OF YOTERS 

Barbara J. Rousseau, Ch. 1979 

Joan E.Logan 1981 

JohnKobos 1980 

Ml Harold G. Comeau, Clerk 1981 



M WIRING INSPECTOR 

Alfred Tobiasz 



1979 



S INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT 
FINANCING AUTHORITY 

Ben Collins 1979 

Loretta Dietch 1980 

George E.Howe 1981 

James C.Lahar 1982 

F. Dale Vincent 1983 

E Elected 

S Appointed By Board of Selectmen 

M Appointed By Town Manager 

Other 

1 Supervised By Town Manager 

2 Elected At Town Meeting 

3 Appointed By Moderator 

4 General Laws 

5 1976 STM Art II 

6 Confirmed By Board of Selectmen 



WARRANT FOR THE SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 

ESSEX, s.s. 

To the Constable of the Town of Ipswich in said County, 

GREETINGS: 

In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts you are hereby direct- 
ed to notify the Inhabitants of the Town of Ipswich, qualified to vote in 
Town affairs, to meet at the Ipswich High School, in said Ipswich on 

MONDAY, THE SIXTH DAY OF FEBRUARY 1978 
at 7:30 o'clock in the evening, then and there to act on the following articles, 
viz: 

Article 1: To see if the Town will vote to dedicate a playground on land 
adjacent to Linebrook Road as the John S. Bialek Memorial Park; or to 
take any other action relative thereto. 

Article 2: To see if the Town will vote to authorize the expenditure of Federal 
Anti-recessionary fiscal assistance monies to fund a contract for fiscal 1978 
for the Municipal Employees covered under Local #2905, AFSCME, and 
to authorize the expenditure of Federal Anti-recessionary fiscal assistance 
monies to fund the salary adjustments in the Library Department Budget 
Salary Account for fiscal 1978; or to take any other action relative thereto. 

Article 3: To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money from 
the Water Department surplus account to fund a contract for fiscal 1978 for 
said department's employees covered under Local #2905, AFSCME, and to 
further transfer a sum of money from the Water Department surplus account 
to the plant and investment account and to authorize the expenditure of 
same; or to take any other action relative thereto. 

Article 4: To see if the Town will vote to authorize the expenditure of a 
sum of monies from the Federal Anti-recessionary fiscal assistance account 
and a sum of monies from the Federal general revenue sharing account to 
fund deficiencies in the miscellaneous finance account; or to take any other 
action relative thereto. 

Article 5: To see if the Town will vote to authorize the expenditure of Federal 
General Revenue Sharing monies to explore and test possible well water 
locations within the Town for the development of additional wellfields and 
wells, and related materiel and services; or to take any other action relative 
thereto. 

Article 6: To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen 
to acquire easements and/or other interest(s) by purchase, gift, lease, eminent 
domain or otherwise in certain parcels of land consisting of approximately 
fifteen (15) acres on Fellows Road, east of Candlewood Road, for the loca- 
tion and installation of a new well, and to authorize the expenditure of 
Federal General Revenue Sharing monies for said purpose; or to take any 
other action relative thereto. 

Article 7: To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of 
money for the purpose of surveying, designing and constructing an extension 
of the sanitary sewer system in the area of Wood's Lane, Grant Court and 
Poplar Street, or any portion thereof, and to authorize the Board of Select- 
men to acquire such easements and/or other interest(s) as may be necessary 
to effectuate said extension of the sanitary sewer system by purchase, gift, 



lease, eminent domain, or otherwise, and to determine whether such 
appropriation shall be raised by borrowing or otherwise; or to take any 
other action relative thereto. 

Article 8: To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of 
money for the purpose of surveying, designing and constructing an exten- 
sion of the sanitary sewer system in the area of Newmarch Street, from the 
area of Jeffrey's Neck Road to a point approximately one hundred feet 
east of Jurdin Hill Road, or any portion thereof, to authorize the Board 
of Selectmen to acquire such easements and/or other interest(s) as may be 
necessary to effectuate said extension of the sanitary sewer system by pur- 
chase, gift, lease, eminent domain, or otherwise; and to determine whether 
such appropriation shall be raised by borrowing or otherwise; or to take 
any other action relative thereto. 

Article 9: To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of 
money for the purpose of surveying, designing, and constructing an exten- 
sion of the sanitary sewer system in the area of Argilla Road, a distance 
of approximately three hundred (300'0") feet, and to authorize the Board 
of Selectmen to acquire such easements and/or other interest(s) as may be 
necessary to effectuate said extension of the sanitary sewer system by pur- 
chase, gift, lease, eminent domain, or otherwise; and to determine whether 
such appropriation shall be raised by borrowing or otherwise; or to take 
any other action relative thereto. 

Article 10: To see if the Town will vote (1) to rescind its vote on Article 63 
of the 1966 Annual Town Meeting, which article authorized borrowing 
monies for an extension of the sanitary sewer system along Mile Lane, (2) 
to rescind its vote on Article 19 of the 1973 Annual Town Meeting to the 
extent of the remaining balance of monies authorized to be borrowed for 
cleaning and cement-lining water lines, and (3) to rescind its vote on Article 
18 of the 1975 Annual Town Meeting to the extent of the remaining balance 
of monies authorized to be borrowed for extending the sanitary sewer system 
along Avery Street and Qornell Road; or to take any other action relative 
thereto. 

Article 11: To see if the Town will vote to amend the By-Laws, Chapter 
XV, by adding the following new section 10: 

"Section 10. Water Use Restriction and Restraint — The Board of Water 
Commissioners may upon seven (7) days' notice to the public by newspaper 
publication and after a public hearing restrict or restrain the use of water 
in any manner on public and/or private premises by any means, including 
by shutting off the water or the curb cock, during a drought, hurricane, 
conflagration, or other disaster when in the opinion of the department of 
public health an emergency exists. No person shall violate any such restric- 
tion or restraint while same remains in effect." 

Article 12: To see if the Town will vote to authorize the expenditure of Fed- 
eral General Revenue Sharing monies for the purpose of conducting a fair 
cash revaluation of all properties in the Town; or to take any other action 
relative thereto. 

Article 13: To see if the Town will vote to authorize the expenditure of moni- 
ies from free cash to pay unpaid bills incurred in previous years and remain- 
ing unpaid; or to take any other action relative thereto. 



Article 14: To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money from 
the Water Department Surplus Account to pay any Water Department un- 
paid bills incurred in previous years, and remaining unpaid; or to take any 
other action relative thereto. 

Article 15: To see if the Town will vote to amend the By-Laws, Chapter 
XI, by adding a new section 13 as follows: 

"Section 13. Optional Purchasing Procedure — When the estimated 
amount of a proposed contract for the purchase of material, supplies or 
equipment, or for any work or service to be performed for the Town (other 
than services of architects or other services of a professional nature or service 
performed by a person regularly employed by the Town as a part of the 
duties of such employment) exceeds $2,000, proposals shall be called for 
in the manner provided in Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 40: 4B, 
except as otherwise specifically authorized in writing by the Board of Select- 
men, provided that the last mentioned exception shall not apply when the 
estimated amount of such contract exceeds $3,500, or such authorization is 
limited or prohibited by statute. 

Article 16: To see if the Town will vote to authorize the expenditure of 
Federal General Revenue Sharing monies and other funds to replace the 
bridge on Labor in Vain Road which crosses Labor in Vain Creek, and to 
authorize the Board of Selectmen to acquire such easements and/or other 
interest(s) as may be necessary to effectuate such replacement; or to take 
any other action relative thereto. 

And you are directed to serve this Warrant by posting up attested copies 
thereof, one at the Post Office, one at the Town House and one at each of 
the meeting houses and by publication, seven days at least prior to the time 
for holding said meeting, in a newspaper published in, or having a general 
circulation in the Town of Ipswich. 

Given unto our hands this Twenty Third day of January in the year of our 
Lord, One Thousand Nine Hundred and Seventy Eight. 

BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

Merle R. Pimentel — Chairman 

Edwin H. Damon, Jr. 

John M. Pickard 

John A. Pechilis 

Adele C. Robertson 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 
IPSWICH HIGH SCHOOL FEBRUARY 6, 1978 

The meeting was called to order at 7:30 p.m. with the following in atten- 
dance: Harold Shively, Moderator; Harold G. Comeau, Town Clerk; George 
E. Howe, Town Manager; Gustave Comeau. 

Mr. Howe made a motion that the meeting be adjourned for lack of a 
quorum until 7:30 p.m. Monday, February 13, 1978. Seconded. Unanimous 
vote. 



IPSWICH HIGH SCHOOL FEBRUARY 13, 1978 

The meeting was called to order at 7:30 p.m. by Moderator Shively, who 
announced that, with 333 voters needed for a quorum, the meeting was 80 
short of that number. It was moved, seconded, and voted unanimously to 
postpone the start of the meeting until 7:45 p.m. 

At 7:45 p.m. the Moderator announced that there still was no quorum. It 
was moved, seconded, and voted unanimously to postpone the opening for 
another 15 minutes, until 8:00 p.m., in the hope of obtaining a quorum. 

At 8:00 Dr. Shively announced that there was not a quorum present. 
Chairman Pimentel moved that the meeting be postponed until the Annual 
Town Meeting on May 1, 1978. Seconded. Unanimous vote. The final count 
was 298 voters. 

ATTEST: 
Harold G. Comeau 
Town Clerk 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING WARRANT 
-1978- 

ESSEX, s.s. 

To the Constable of the Town of Ipswich in said County, 

GREETINGS: 

In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, you are hereby 
directed to notify the Inhabitants of the Town of Ipswich qualified to vote 
in town affairs to meet at the Ipswich High School in said Ipswich on 

MONDAY, THE FIRST DAY OF MAY 1978 
at 7:30 o'clock in the evening to act on the following articles viz: 

ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 
IPSWICH HIGH SCHOOL MAY 1, 1978 

Moderator Harold Shively called the meeting to order at 7:30 p.m. with a 
quorum present. The Final count showed 601 voters present. 

The Moderator appointed the following tellers: John Stella, Jeffrey Hardy, 
Leslie Cutler, Joanne Babson, Jeffrey LaMarca, Martha Gilford, Matthew 
Desmond. 

The Moderator led the pledge of allegiance to the flag, and the Rev. Merle 
Pimentel gave the invocation. The Moderator announced that the Warrant 
had been properly posted. 

It was moved, seconded, and duly voted to allow non-voters into the Town 
Meeting. 

Chairman of the Board of Selectmen Merle Pimentel moved that the 
Annual Town Meeting be temporarily recessed for the Special Town Meet- 
ing. Seconded. Motion carried. Mr. Pimentel moved for indefinite post- 
ponement of Articles 1 through 16. Seconded. Motion carried. Mr. Pimentel 
moved to dissolve the Special Town Meeting. Seconded. Motion carried. 



Article 1: To fix the salary and compensation of all elected town officers. 

Article 1: Mr. Pimentel moved that the salary and compensation of all elect- 
ed officials be fixed as in the 1978/79 budget. Seconded. Motion carried 
on voice vote. 

Article 2: To choose the following officers, viz: Moderator for one (1) year. 
Two (2) Selectmen for three (3) years. Constable for one (1) year. Three 
(3) Members of the School Committee for three (3) years. One (1) Member 
of the Housing Authority for five (5) years. The above officers to be voted 
on one ballot at their respective polling places as follows: Precinct 1 Ipswich 
Junior High School, Green Street. Precinct 2 Winthrop School, Central 
Street. Precinct 3 Ipswich High School, High Street. Precinct 4 Housing 
Authority Recreation Hall, Caroline Avenue. On Monday, May 8, 1978. 
The polls shall open at 10:00 a.m. and close at 8:00 p.m. 

Article 2: To choose the following officers, viz: 

Moderator for one (1) year. 

Two (2) Selectmen for three (3) years 

Constable for one (1) year 

Three (3) members of the School Committee for three (3) years 

One (1) member of the Housing Authority for five (5) years 

The above officers to be voted on one ballot at their respective polling 
places as follows: 

Precinct 1 Ipswich Junior High School, Green Street 
Precinct 2 Winthrop School, Central Street 
Precinct 3 Ipswich High School, High Street 
Precinct 4 Housing Authority Recreation Hall, Caroline Avenue 
On Monday, May 8, 1978. The polls shall be open at 10:00 a.m. and shall 
close at 8:00 p.m. 

No action required. 

Article 3: To choose one (1) member of the Finance Committee to serve 
for three (3) years. 

Article 3: Mr. Pimentel moved that Larry Pszenny be nominated to the 
Finance Committee to serve for three years. Seconded. Board of Selectmen 
unanimously recommended. Motion carried. 

Article 4: To see if the Town will vote to dedicate a playground on land 
adjacent to Linebrook Road as the John S. Bialek Memorial Park; or to 
take any other action relative thereto. 

Article 4: Selectman Edwin Damon, Jr. moved that the Town dedicate its 
playground on land adjacent to Linebrook Road as the John S. Bialek 
Memorial Park, and further that the Board of Selectmen is directed to hold 
appropriate dedication ceremonies at the Park. Seconded. Mr. Damon 
stated that Mr. Bialek had served the Town long and well, especially its 
young people. Clarence Dupray stated that he had understood it was the 
Little League Field that was to be dedicated to Mr. Bialek, not the whole 
playground, and while he was in favor of renaming the Little League Field, 
he did not feel Linebrook Playground, an historic landmark, should be. 
Mr. Damon informed him that the motion's intent was to rename the entire 
complex with the exception of that portion already named for Chester Bowen, 
Jr. The motion carried on a voice vote. 

10 



Article 5: To see if the Town will vote to authorize the expenditure of Federal 
Anti-reccesionary fiscal assistance monies to fund a contract for fiscal 1978 
for the Municipal Employees covered under Local #2905, AFSCME, and to 
authorize the expenditure of Federal Anti-recessionary fiscal assistance 
monies to fund the salary adjustments in the Library Department Budget 
Salary Account for fiscal 1978; or to take any other action relative thereto. 

Article 5: Selectman Adele Robertson moved that the Town appropriate 
the sume of $28,294 from the Federal Anti-recessionary Fiscal Assistance 
Account to fund salaries and fringe benefits according to the provisions of a 
contract for Fiscal 1978 for municipal employees covered under Local #2905 
AFSCME and further that the Town appropriate the sum of $654 from the 
Federal Anti-recessionary Fiscal Assistance Account to fund salary adjust- 
ments in the Library Department salary account for fiscal 1978. Seconded. 
This amount covers retroactive wage increases, amounting to 36 cents per 
hour across the board, from July 1, 1977 to June 30, 1978. Mrs. Mary 
Conley stated that the Finance Committee approved the motion feeling it 
was reasonable and fair, and the increases were less than the cost-of-living 
rate in the Boston area. The Town Manager's detailed study of wages was 
very helpful. The contract's second year calls for a 5!4% increase, which 
appears in the budget, and also for job descriptions, which is an important 
part of the contract. The motion carried on a voice vote. 

Article 6: To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money from 
the Water Department surplus account to fund a contract for fiscal 1978 
for said department's employees covered under Local #2905, AFSCME; 
or to take any other action relative thereto. 

Article 6: Mrs. Robertson moved that the Town appropriate from the Water 
Department surplus account the sum of $5,819 to fund salaries and fringe 
benefits according to the provisions of a contract for fiscal 1978 for the 
Water Department employees covered under Local #2905, AFSCME. 
Seconded. Mrs. Conley stated the Finance Committee approved. The motion 
carried. 

Article 7: To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of monies from 
free cash to fund supplements to the Fire Department budgets for Fiscal 
Years 1975, 1976, 1977 and 1978 to implement the terms of a contract with 
Local #1913, IAFF for Fiscal Years 1975, 1976, and 1977; or to take any 
other action relative thereto. 

Article 7: Mrs. Robertson moved that the Town vote to appropriate the sum 
of $126,366 from free cash to fund supplements to the salary and fringe 
benefit accounts of the Fire Department budgets for fiscal years 1975, 1976, 
1977, and 1978, according to the provisions of a tentative contract with 
Local #1913, IAFF for fiscal years 1975, 1976, and 19777" Seconded. Mrs. 
Robertson informed the meeting that Arthur Hardy, president of the Fire- 
men's Union, had called the Town Manager Monday afternoon to say that 
the firemen would sign the contract and the date for the signing had been 
set. Mrs. Conley said the Finance Committee suported this article; it had 
opposed the 1974 contract mainly on the minimum manning and phantom 
overtime clauses, and also compulsory binding arbitration. The Committee 
felt the long legal struggle was worth it, as the court finally decided the Town 
could not be forced to accept the minimum manning and phantom over- 
time. Motion carried on a unanimous voice vote. 

11 



Article 8: To see if the Town will vote to authorize the expenditure of a sum 
of monies from the Federal Anti-recessionary fiscal assistance account and 
a sum of monies from the Federal general revenue sharing account to fund 
deficiencies in the Fiscal Year 1978 budget Miscellaneous Finance Account; 
or to take any other action relative thereto. 

Article 8: Selectman John Pechilis moved that the Town appropriate the 
sum of $27,907 from the Federal Anti-recessionary Fiscal Assistance 
Account to fund deficiencies in the FY 1978 Miscellaneous Finance Account 
for Town package, auto liability, workmen's compensation, and health and 
life insurance, and that the Town appropriate the sum of $18,003 from the 
Federal General Revenue Sharing account to fund deficiencies in the FY 78 
Miscellaneous Finance Account for Town package, auto liability, work- 
men's compensation, health and life insurance and school package and legal 
liability insurance. Seconded. Finance Committee recommended. Unanimous 
voice vote. 

Article 9: To hear and act upon the report of the Finance Committee relative 
to the Municipal Budget and raise, appropriate and transfer money for the 
ensuing year, including the compensation of elected town officers and to 
authorize the expenditure of a sum of monies from the Federal General 
Revenue sharing Account for the aforementioned purposes; or take any 
other action relative thereto. 

Article 9: Finance Committee Chairman Lawrence Pszenny moved that the 
sum of $3,038,562 be raised and appropriated for the purposes hereafter 
designated: 



For the Operating Budget (see detail) $3,558,440 
Transfer from Available Funds 

Sewer Receipts Reserve 58,495 

County Dog Fund 2,317 

Library Aid Reserve 5,152 

Surplus Revenue (free cash) 100,000 

Overlay Surplus to Reserve Fund 50,000 

Water Pollution Control 2,400 

Cemetery Perpetual Care Income 3 1 ,000 

Library Trust Fund Income 8,000 

257,364 

Transfer from Revenue Sharing 

Highway Capital Outlay 49,000 

Planning Board-Consultants-General 10,000 

Outside Services-Audit 10,000 

Highway Expenses-Street Lighting 55,000 

Recreation & Youth Services-Capital Outlay 11,017 

Sanitation Composite Contract 82,500 

Council on Aging - Expenses 4,902 

Fire Department Salaries & Wages 40,095 t 

262,514 

Available Funds and Revenue Sharing 5 19,878 



To be Raised and Assessed $3 ,038,562 

12 



OPERATING BUDGET 
GENERAL GOVERNMENT 



Appro- Recom- 

Expended Expended priated Request mended 

1975-76 1976-77 1977-78 1978-79 1978-79 

1. MODERATOR: 

Salary 100 100 100 100 100 

Expenses - - 25 25 25 

Total 100 100 125 125 125 

2. SELECTMEN: 

' Salaries & Wages 9,808 11,450 11,360 11,854 11,854 

Expenses 7,876 1,878 1,900 2,104 2,104 

Capital Outlay — 225 75 120 120 

Total 17,684 13,553 13,335 14,078 14,078 

3. FINANCE COMMITTEE: 

Salaries & Wages 121 100 150 150 250 

Expenses 1,426 1,508 1,675 1,770 1,770 

Total 1,547 1,608 1,825 1,920 2,020 

4. PLANNING BOARD: 

Salaries & Wages 450 685 2,000 1,200 1,200 

Expenses 925 1,127 2,235 290 290 
Planning Consultants 

Reimbursable — — — 3,500 1,000 

General 2,148 8,718 3,500 10,000 10,000 

Capital Outlay — — — 280 280 

Total 3,523 10,530 7,735 15,270 12,770 

5. ELECTIONS & REGISTRATION: 

Salaries & Wages 5,718 9,638 5,500 10,050 10,050 

Expenses 3,522 3,341 3,400 3,425 3,425 

Capital Outlay 2,525 — 650 — — 

Total 11,765 12,979 9,550 13,475 13,475 

6. APPEALS BOARD: 

Salaries & Wages 390 320 400 400 360 

Expenses 360 263 325 325 325 

Total 750 583 725 725 685 

7. TOWN MANAGER: 

Salaries & Wages 39,871 43,672 42,971 46,349 46,349 

Expenses 18,323 8,136 11,095 22,485 21,597 

Capital Outlay — — 2,700 1,000 

Total 58,194 51,808 54,066 71,534 68,946 

8. ACCOUNTANT: 

Salaries & Wages 35,447 37,479 37,773 42,469 42,469 

Expenses 6,619 6,921 7,625 7,224 7,224 

Capital Outlay 7,993 9,062 12,050 — — 

Total 50,059 53,462 57,448 49,693 49,693 

9. TREASURER/COLLECTOR: 

Salaries & Wages 36,715 32,689 40,360 40,113 39,763 

Expenses 5,364 5,068 5,475 17,575 5,380 

•Capital Outlay 675 — — 4,752 — 

Total 42,754 37,757 45,835 62,440 45,143 

10. ASSESSORS: 

Salaries & Wages 30,467 32,436 33,093 35,961 35,961 

Expenses 2,880 3,558 3,155 3,147 3,147 

Capital Outlay — — 175 120 120 

Total 33,347 35,994 36,423 39,228 39,228 



13 



11. TOWN CLERK: 



Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 
Total 


14,112 

1,102 

955 

16,169 


14,900 
1,261 

16,161 


15,993 
1,630 

17,623 


21,937 
1,630 

23,567 


21,937 
1,630 

23,567 


12. LEGAL DEPARTMENT: 
Salaries & Wages 
Other Outside Council 
Town Council-Litigation 
Expenses 
Total 


7,400 

6,909 

4,253 

93 

18,655 


7,600 

6,050 

490 

14,140 


7,980 

6,000 

780 

14,760 


8,420 

8,000 
1,115 

17,535 


8,000 

7,000 

935 

15,935 


13. INDUSTRIAL COMMISSION: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Total 


— 


99 
10 

109 


350 
250 
600 


200 
100 
300 


325 
100 

425 


14. HISTORICAL COMMISSION: 

Expenses 


652 




725 


2,825 


2,825 



15. CONSERVATION COMMISSION: 

Salaries & Wages 652 

Expenses '607 

Capital Outlay 200 

Total 1,459 



672 


840 


1,200 


810 


893 


2,875 


1,625 


1,350 


— 


200 


5,500 


420 


565 


3,915 


8,325 


2,580 



16. HISTORIC DISTRICT COMMISSION: 

Expenses — — 

17. RECREATION AND YOUTH SERVICES: 
Salaries & Wages 73,332 79,113 
Expenses 32,325 29,382 
Capital Outlay 627 3,712 
Total 106,284 112,207 

18. BICENTENNIAL COMMITTEE: 

Salary 600 — 

Expenses 7,308 — 

Total 7,908 — 

19. SCHOOL BUILDING NEEDS COMMITTEE: 

Expenses 5 — 

Total 5 — 



150 



75,747 

33,175 

10,600 

119,522 



150 



81,370 

30,642 

16,777 

128,789 



50 



81,370 

28,607 

15,927 

125,904 



20. COUNCIL ON AGING: 












Salaries & Wages 


— 


300 


1,200 


— 


— 


Expenses 


6,042 


7,576 


7,743 


13,070 


13,070 


Total 


6,042 


7,876 


8,943 


13,070 


13,070 


TOTAL GENERAL 












GOVERNMENT 


376,897 


370,432 


393,305 


463,049 


430,519 




PUBLIC SAFETY 








21. POLICE DEPARTMENT: 












Salaries & Wages 












Chief 












Base 


20,600 


21,843 


22,938 


22,938 


22,938 


Incentive 


3,059 


3,276 


3,441 


3,441 


3,441 


Holiday 


931 


1,004 


1,055 


1,055 


1,055 


Total 


24,590 


26,123 


27,434 


27,434 


27,434 


Sergeants 


(3)37,665 


48,705 


(4)58,172 


(4)57,977 


(4)57,977 


Base 












Incentive 


2,391 


5,004 


6,090 


5,552 


5,552 


Holiday 


1,725 


2,164 


2,676 


2,667 


2,667 


Total 


41,781 


55,873 


(4)66,938 


66,196 


66,196 



14 



Patrolmen 












Base 


(15)156,821 


190,794 (16)200,771 (16)201,418 (16)201,418 


Incentive 


15,092 


16,190 


20,882 


22,791 


22,791 


Holiday 


7,157 


8,741 


9,231 


9,299 


9,299 


Total 


(15)179,070 (16)215,725 (16)230,884 (16)233,508 (16)233,508 


Patrolmen - New 












Base 


(1)10,292 


— 


— 


— 


— 


Holiday 


473 


— 


— 


— 


— 


Total 


10,765 


— 


— 


— 


— 


Overtime 


13,999 


13,826 


13,500 


13,500 


13,500 


Shift differential 


4,115 


5,946 


6,344 


7,298 


6,598 


Court Fees 


4,931 


7,044 


6,500 


6,500 


6,500 


Other Salaries 


4,292 


4,866 


8,018 


8,592 


8,592 


Total Salaries 


283,543 


329,403 


359,618 


363,028 


362,328 


Expenses 


29,608 


36,287 


44,360 


45,115 


43,998 


Capital Outlay 


13,383 


— 


2,100 


4,039 


575 


Total 


326,534 


365,690 


406,078 


412,182 


406,901 


22. DOG OFFICER: 












Salaries & Wages 


6,938 


7,642 


8,500 


9,435 


9,435 


Expenses 


3,351 


2,381 


2,565 


2,900 


2,900 


Capital Outlay 


— 


— 


— 


327 


327 


Total 


10,289 


10,023 


11,065 


12,662 


12,662 


22. FIRE DEPARTMENT: 












Salaries & Wages 












Chief 












Base 


17,908 


17,830 


17,830 


17,830 


17,830 


Incentive 


600 


588 


600 


— 


— 


Holiday 


752 


751 


752 


752 


752 


Total 


19,260 


19,169 


19,182 


18,582 


18,582 


Captains 












Base 


(3)33,094 


33,100 


33,015 


33,015 


33,015 


Salary Differential 


— 


3,046 


3,000 


3,050 


3,050 


Holiday 


1,392 


1,392 


1,161 


1,161 


1,161 


Total 


34,486 


37,538 


37,176 


37,226 


37,226 


Firefighters 












Base 


(14)127,307 


131,346(14) 


Incentive 


— 


— 


— 


600 


600 


Holiday 


5,279 


5,486 


4,635 


4,635 


4,635 


Total 


132,586 


136,832 


137,388 


141,191 


141,191 


Contractual Wage Adjustment 


— 


— 


38,300 


38,300 


Overtime 


7,290 


9,840 


7,000 


7,000 


7,000 


Call Lieutenants (5) 


2,100 


2,400 


2,400 


2,400 


2,400 


Call Operator (1) 


700 


800 


800 


800 


800 


Call Men (26) 


13,400 


16,540 


18,200 


18,200 


18,200 


Total Salaries 


209,822 


223,119 


222,146 


263,699 


263,699 


Expenses 


16,207 


14,333 


16,910 


18,505 


17,285 


Capital Outlay 


2,174 


30,968 


3,675 


3,650 


2,800 


Total 


228,203 


268,420 


242,731 


285,854 


283,784 


24. CIVIL DEFENSE: 












Salaries & Wages 


1,800 


1,800 


1,800 


2,400 


2,400 


Expenses 


1,448 


1,521 


1,305 


4,102 


2,785 


Capital Outlay 


866 


946 


650 


2,860 


— 


Total 


4,114 


4,267 


3,755 


9,362 


5,185 


25. SHELLFISH: 












Salaries & Wages 


13,830 


14,643 


14,725 


14,494 


16,164 


Expenses 


1,286 


775 


2,600 


2,275 


2,275 


Capital Outlay 


941 


5,400 


600 


255 


255 


Total 


16,057 


20,818 


17,925 


17,024 


18,694 


26. HARBORS: 












Salaries & Wages 


3,000 


3,000 


3,000 


3,500 


3,200 


Expenses 


742 


698 


1,610 


1,695 


1,415 


Capital Outlay 


4,755 


375 


150 


— 


— 


Total 


8,497 


4,073 


4,760 


5,195 


4,615 



15 



27. 


BUILDING INSPECTOR: 














Salaries & Wages 


10,750 


11,200 


11,760 


14,215 


13,540 




Expenses 


1,135 


1,132 


1,275 


1,700 


1,700 




Capital Outlay 


— 


— 


— 


80 


80 




Total 


11,885 


12,332 


13,035 


15,995 


15,320 



TOTAL PUBLIC SAFETY 605,579 685,623 699,349 

HEALTH & SANITATION 



758,274 747,161 



28. 



29. 



HEALTH AGENT: 

Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

OUTSIDE CONTRACTS: 

Sanitation Composite Contract 
Recycling Collection 
Spring & Fall Cleaning 
Dump Improvement 
Total 



15,863 


6,021 


16,410 


12,305 


12,305 


33,638 


31,205 


36,505 


38,890 


38,790 


75 


— 


— 


150 


150 


49,576 


47,226 


52,915 


51,345 


51,245 


92,000 


78,000 


82,750 


82,750 


82,750 


699 


— 


— 


— 


— 


1,300 


1,350 


1,400 


1,400 


1,400 


1,414 


649 


1,000 


— 


— 


95,413 


79,999 


85,150 


84,150 


84,150 



TOTAL HEALTH 
& SANITATION 



144,989 127,225 138,065 
VETERANS' SERVICES 



135,495 135,395 



30. 



31. 



32. 



33. 



34. 



35. 



36. 



37. 



VETERAN'S BENEFITS: 












Expenses 


101,138 


92,050 


120,000 


120,000 


110,000 


Total 


101,138 


92,050 


120,000 


120,000 


110,000 




PUBLIC WORKS 








ADMINISTRATION: 












Salaries & Wages 


8,057 


15,053 


16,095 


27,230 


27,230 


Expenses 


1,658 


1,667 


1,600 


1,995 


1,800 


Capital Outlay 


— 


— 


550 


90 


90 


Total 


9,715 


16,720 


18,245 


29,315 


29,120 


TOWN HALL: 












Salaries & Wages 


8,510 


8,978 


8,979 


10,192 


10,192 


Expenses 


20,677 


11,002 


7,700 


10,000 


10,000 


Capital Outlay 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


Total 


29,187 


19,980 


16,679 


20,292 


20,292 


TOWN HALL ANNEX: 












Expenses 




6,737 


5,650 


7,350 


7,350 


HIGHWAY DIVISION: 












Salaries & Wages 


84,916 


92,452 


97,030 


110,120 


109,620 


Expenses 


134,452 


174,650 


190,725 


215,380 


203,435 


Capital Outlay 


47,633 


21,259 


15,000 


76,344 


73,844 


Total 


267,001 


288,361 


302,755 


401,844 


386,899 


EQUIPMENT MAINTENANCE: 










Salaries & Wages 


11,527 


12,389 


12,432 


13,799 


13,699 


Expenses 


28,816 


37,221 


32,33S~ 


33,115 


32,950 


Total 


40,343 


49,610 


44,770 


46,914 


46,649 


SNOW & ICE CONTROL: 












Salaries & Wages 


19,001 


24,252 


15,000 


15,000 


15,000 


Expenses 


25,424 


38,772 


30,900 


30,900 


30,900 


Rental 


22,837 


43,064 


12,000 


10,500 


12,000 


Total 


67,262 


106,088 


57,900 


56,400 


57,900 


FORESTRY: 












Salaries & Wages 


46,784 


42,256 


45,600 


41,150 


39,150 


Expenses 


20,664 


20,361 


24,255 


25,588 


26,668 


Capital Outlay 


11,089 


19,849 


3,750 


16,900 


900 


Total 


78,537 


82,466 


73,605 


83,638 


66,718 



16 



38. 


SEWER: 

Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 
Total 


19,869 
15,380 

35,249 


52,388 
60,190 

112,578 


67,902 

96,700 

15,000 

179,602 


88,410 

93,348 

4,506 

186,264 


84,011 

86,375 

4,050 

174,436 




TOTAL PUBLIC WORKS 


527,294 


682,540 


699,206 


832,017 


789,364 


39. 


CEMETERIES: 

Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 
Total 


53,265 
10,045 
23,998 
87,308 


57,651 

10,817 

9,996 

78,464 


59,081 

11,739 

9,000 

79,820 


67,729 

13,628 

6,670 

88,027 


67,729 

12,795 

6,425 

86,949 


40. 


INSURANCE: 

Motor Vehicle 
Workmen's Compensation 
Package Insurance 
Public Official Bonds 
Legal Liability 
Total 


7,634 

26,388 

29,161 

90 

2,007 
65,280 


10,072 
31,289 
29,266 
621 
2,007 
73,255 


13,713 
20,502 
11,350 
1,500 
4,500 
51,565 


12,510 

23,485 

30,511 

1,305 

6,628 

74,439 


12,510 

23,485 

30,511 

1,305 

6,628 

74,439 


41. 


BENEFITS: 

Military Service Credits 
County Retirement System 
Health & Life 
Total 


10,787 
214,191 

95,705 
320,683 


13,190 

272,337 
130,458 
415,985 


13,200 

295,776 
130,000 
438,976 


14,500 
288,646 
165,370 
468,516 


14,500 
288,646 
165,370 
468,516 


42. 


DEBT SERVICE: 

Payment of Interest 
Payment of Principal 
Total 


61,990 
328,000 
389,990 


48,795 
218,000 
266,795 


59,915 
285,000 
344,915 


68,597 
432,500 
501,097 


68,597 
432,500 
501,097 


43. 


LIBRARY: 

Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 
Total 


60,606 

27,238 

293 

88,137 


63,966 

31,224 

812 

96,002 


67,412 

38,012 

800 

106,224 


74,371 

39,800 

700 

114,871 


73,300 

38,800 

700 

112,800 






UNCLASSIFIED 








44. 


OUTSIDE SERVICES AUDIT 


— 


— 


— 


12,000 


10,000 


45. 


RESERVE FUND (see schedule) — 


— 


100,000 


50,000 


50,000 


46. 


BOND ISSUE COSTS 


— 


35 


5,000 


10,000 


5,000 



47. INTEREST ON TAX 

ANTICIPATION NOTES 12,189 2,726 20,000 40,000 30,000 

48. POSTAGE — 6,400 7,000 8,000 7,200 
Total 12,189 9,161 132,000 120,000 102,200 

TOTAL OPERATING BUDGET 2,719,484 2,897,532 3,203,425 3,675,785 3,558,440 

Seconded. Mr. Pszenny mentioned that this budget was up $355,015 or 
11% from last year's, with the largest increase being in salaries and wages. 
The Police and Fire salaries for fiscal 1979 will have to be voted on at a later 
Town Meeting. The Finance Committee commended Town Manager Howe 
for having presented it with "the best budget package ever received." No 
new personnel have been added, and two departments were combined. The 
budget could not be further reduced without cutting services. The Committee 
plans to hold hearings this summer and autumn to get the public's views 
on cutting costs, and asks that residents fill out the "gripe sheets" included 
with the Finance Committee Report and return them. Mr. Pszenny told the 
citizens that if they wished to continue receiving all services, then they must 
be able to pay for them. The motion carried on a voice vote. 



17 



Article 10: To hear and act upon the report of the School Committee relative 
to the School Department Budget and raise, appropriate and transfer money 
for the ensuing year's operations; or take any other action relative thereto. 

Article 10: Chairman of the School Committee Mrs. M. Patricia Manning 
moved that the Town appropriate the sum of $4,214,689 for the School 
Department Budget as here and after designated: 

1 000 Administration $ 122,580 

2000 Instruction 2,867,742 

3000 Other School Services 455,132 

3500 Athletics 112,079 

4000 Operation and Maintenance of Plant 48 1 ,943 

5000 Fixed Charges 55,247 

7000 Acquisition of Fixed Assets 52,216 

9000 Programs with Other Districts 75,250 

4,222,189 
Less Available funds: 

Feoffees Grammar School 7,500 

Total to be raised and assessed is: $4,214,689 

Seconded. This budget shows a 3.5% increase over last year; despite the 
decline in pupils, salaries and building maintenance continue to rise, special 
needs costs are up. Mr. Pszenny stated that the Finance Committee recom- 
mended the article, commended the School Committee for efforts to keep 
the budget down and mentioned the difficulty in making meaningful re- 
ductions with so many state-mandated programs. Bill Fithian asked what 
exactly was involved in the Instruction part of the budget; Mrs. Manning 
told him that it included all teachers' salaries and all supplies. The motion 
carried on a voice vote. 

Article 11: To see if the Town will raise and appropriate a sum of money 
to cover the Town's share of the annual operating and debt service expenses 
of the Whittier Regional Vocational Technical High School District. 

Article 11: Edward Penny, member of the Whittier Regional Vocational 
Technical High School Committee, moved that the Town raise and appro- 
priate the sum of $248,678 to cover the Town's share of the annual operating 
and debt service expenses of the Whittier Regional Vocational Technical High 
School District. Seconded. Our assessment this year is 15% less than last 
year; the number of pupils attending from Ipswich has also decreased. The 
Finance Committee supported the article. The motion carried on a voice vote. 

Article 12: To see if the Town will raise and appropriate a sum of money for 
the current expense of the Water Department, the same to be paid for rev- 
enues of the Water Department during the fiscal year 1979 and to transfer 
a sum of money from the surplus account to water plant and investment; 
or to take any other action relative thereto. 

Article 12: Selectman John Pickard moved that the Town raise and appro- 
priate the sum of $271,536 for the current expense of the Water Department, 
the same to be paid from revenues by the Water Department during the 
Fiscal Year 1979; and further that the Town vote to transfer the sum of 
$36,845 from the surplus account to Water Plant and Investment. Seconded. 
Finance Committee recommended. Motion carried on a voice vote. 

18 



Article 13: To see what action the Town will take in regard to the transfer 
of any surplus funds in the Electric Light Department. 

Article 13: Mr. Pimentel moved that the Town transfer the sum of $25,000 
from the Surplus Account of the Electric Light Department to the General 
Fund for the purpose of reducing taxes. Seconded. Mr. Pimentel stated that 
a large amount, $41,993, will be coming back into the Town Treasury to 
cover a previous year's balance for insurance. The Finance Committee re- 
commended, and Mr. Pszenny remarked that the Finance Committee hoped 
for more from the Electric Department in the future. The motion carried on 
a voice vote. 

Article 14: To see what sum the Town will raise and appropriate to pay 
unpaid bills incurred in previous years and remaining unpaid; or to take 
any other action relative thereto. 

Article 14: Mr. Pickard moved that the sum of $28,186.59 be raised and 
appropriated to pay the following unpaid bills incurred in previous years 
and remaining unpaid. 

TOWN 



Central Fire Station/Department 




Electric Light Department 


$ 138.00 


Town Hall Annex 




Electric Light Department 


1,806.54 


Town Hall 




Electric Light Department 


150.51 


Health Department 




Bill's Trucking, Inc. 


8,080.60 


Sewer Department 




New England Chemical Co. 


930.00 


Assessor's Department 




Varnum S. Pedrick 


120.00 


Youth Commission 




Mike & Sons Oil 


220.38 


Village Meat Market & Deli, Inc. 


61.40 


Legal Service (Firefighter's Arbitration) 




Joseph D. Casey 


835.00 


Planning Board 




Hawthorne Press 


25.00 


SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 




Northeast Metropolitan Reg. Voc. School 


48.00 


Town of Essex 


120.00 


City of Boston 


46.20 


Hamilton Wenham Regional 


3,893.44 


Education Collaboration for 




Greater Boston 


4,867.00 


Ipswich Electric Light Dept. 


6,630.01 


Oxford Chemicals 


195.06 


Litton Educational Publishing Co. 


8.95 


Pendulum Press, Inc. 


10.50 




$28,186.59 



Seconded. Finance Committee recommended. The motion carried on a 
voice vote. 

19 



Article 15: To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money from 
the Water Department Surplus Account to pay any Water Department un- 
paid bills incurred in previous years, and remaining unpaid; or to take any 
other action relative thereto. 

Article 15: Mr. Pechilis moved that the Town vote to appropriate the sum 
of $1,651.66 from the Water Department Surplus account to pay the follow- 
ing unpaid bills incurred in previous years and remaining unpaid: 

D.L. Maher (Dow's Reservoir 

Pump repairs) $1,475.89 
Tufts University (work Study) 175.77 

$1,651.66 

Seconded. Finance Committee recommended. Motion carried on a voice 
vote. 

Article 16: To see if the Town will raise and appropriate a sum of money for 
the purpose of promotion of the Town of Ipswich an equal sum to be made 
available for said purpose from the Chamber of Commerce. 

Article 16: Mr. Pimentel moved that $700 be raised and appropriated to be 
used in conjunction with a matching sum of the Chamber of Commerce for 
the purpose of the promotion of the Town of Ipswich. Seconded. Finance 
Committee recommended. Motion carried. 

Article 17: To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of 
money for construction of roads under Chapter 90 of the General Laws. 

Article 17: Mr. Pickard moved that the sum of $45,340 be raised and appro- 
priated for the construction of roads under Chapter 90 of the General Laws. 
Seconded. Mr. Pickard informed voters that this will be used to repair Line- 
brook Road from Kozeneski's toward town and is a continuation of work 
begun last year. Finance Committee recommended. The motion carried. 

Article 18: To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Treasurer, with 
approval of the Selectmen, to borrow money from time to time in anticipa- 
tion of the revenue for the financial year beginning July 1 , 1978 and ending 
June 30, 1979, in accordance with the provisions of General Laws, Chapter 
44, Section 4, and to renew any note or notes as may be given for a period 
of less than one year, in accordance with provisions of General Laws, Chap- 
ter 44, Section 17. 

Article 18: Mr. Damon moved that the Town vote to authorize the Treasurer, 
with the approval of the Selectmen, to borrow money from time to time in 
anticipation of revenue for the financial year beginning July 1, 1978 and 
ending June 30, 1979 in accordance with the provisions of the General Laws, 
Chapter 44, section 4, and to renew any note or notes as may be given for a 
period of less than one year, in accordance with the provisions of General 
Laws, Chapter 44, section 17. Seconded. Finance Committee recommended. 
Motion carried. 

Article 19: To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Selectmen to petition 
the General Court for an act allowing the Town to renew for one year or any 



20 



other term $398,900 Federal and State Aid Notes which are payable on Aug- 
ust 25, 1978, notwithstanding any provision of Chapter 74 of the Acts of 
1945 as amended; to authorize the Selectmen to petition the General Court 
for an act allowing the Town to renew for one year or any other term $1 14,000 
Federal and State Aid Notes which are payable on November 10, 1978, 
notwithstanding any provision of Chapter 74 of the Acts of 1945 as amended; 
and to authorize the Selectmen to petition the General Court for an act 
allowing the Town to renew for one year or any other term $175,000 Federal 
and State Aid Notes which are payable on May 25, 1979, notwithstanding 
any provision of Chapter 74 of the Acts of 1945 as amended; or take any 
other action with respect thereto. 

Article 19: Mr. Pechilis moved that the Town vote to authorize the Selectmen 
to petition the General Court for an act allowing the Town to renew for one 
year or any other term $398,900 Federal and State Aid Notes which are 
payable on August 25, 1978 notwithstanding any provision of Chapter 74 of 
the Acts of 1945 as amended; to authorize the Selectmen to petition the 
General Court for an act allowing the Town to renew for one year or any 
other term $114,000 Federal and State Aid Notes which are payable Nov- 
ember 10, 1978, notwithstanding any provision of Chapter 74 of the Acts 
of 1945 as amended; and to authorize the Selectmen to petition the General 
Court for an act allowing the Town to renew for one year or any other term 
$175,000 Federal and State Aid Notes which are payable on May 25, 1979, 
notwithstanding any provision of Chapter 74 of the Acts of 1945 as amended. 
Seconded. This refers to appropriations made and voted in prior years; the 
law requires authorization from the General Court after two years to be able 
to bond. Finance Committee recommended. The motion carried on a voice 
vote. 

Article 20: To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of 
monies to explore and test possible well water locations within the Town 
for the development of additional wellfields and wells, and for related mat- 
eriel and services; or to take any other action relative thereto. 

Article 20: Mr. Damon moved that the Town vote to raise and appropriate 
the sum of $15,000 to explore and test possible well water locations and 
obtain related materiel and services in certain parcels of land on Fellow's 
Road; and to obtain a site acquisition plan for said parcels of land. Seconded. 
Mr. Damon said that Town Meeting appropriated $25,000 last year; test- 
ing has been completed and this site has been determined to be the best and 
most likely to receive State approval. The sum asked for is for the next step 
in compliance with State requirements for prolonged pump testing. Finance 
Committee were 8-0-1 in favor, with William Craft stating that we are facing 
serious water problems and the Committee is not altogether satisfied with 
our experience with wells to date. Voters questioned the amount of money 
spent on wells in the last few years and the amount of water gotten, and how 
much it will cost to put the well in question into operation. Mrs. Robertson 
felt that a reservoir is still the best solution, but it would be so expensive 
today to build a Town reservoir that the State 30-B is probably the only 
alternative, and that is at least ten years in the future. Mr. Pechilis felt that 
Mrs. Robertson was right and if we could get Winthrop Wells and the Essex 
Road well on the line, we could get enough water to carry us over while we 
talk to the State about 30B. Most of the land necessary for 30B (1 100 acres) 
is tax-free (State forest). The motion was defeated on a voice vote. 



21 



Article 21: To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen 
to acquire easements and/or other interest(s) by purchase, gift, lease, eminent 
domain or otherwise in certain parcels of land consisting of approximately 
fifteen (15) acres on Fellows Road, west of Candlewood Road, for the location 
and installation of a new well or wells and to acquire related materiel and 
services; to raise and appropriate a sum of monies for said purpose; or to 
take any other action relative thereto. 

Article 21: Mr. Damon moved for indefinite postponement. Seconded. 
Motion carried. 

On the request of the Town Manager and the Board of Selectmen, the 
Moderator asked for a sense of the Meeting regarding a long-term solution 
to the water problem. The majority of those present were in favor. 

Article 22: To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen 
to acquire easements and/or other interest(s) by purchase, gift, lease, eminent 
domain or otherwise in a certain parcel or parcels of land on Topsfield Road 
for public water supply purposes in compliance with applicable State and 
Federal laws and/on regulations; to see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate a sum of money to acquire said easements(s) and/or other inter- 
ests and to survey, design, and construct improvements to the Winthrop 
Wells, so called, and for related materiel and services; and to determine 
whether such appropriation shall be raised by borrowing or otherwise; or to 
take any other action relative thereto. 

Article 22: Mr. Pimentel moved that the Town vote to authorize the Board 
of Selectmen to acquire easements and/or other interest(s) by purchase, gift, 
lease, eminent domain or otherwise in a certain parcel or parcels of land on 
Topsfield Road for public water supply purposes in compliance with applica- 
able State and Federal laws and/or regulations; to appropriate the sum of 
$42,623 to acquire said easement(s) and/or other interests and to survey, de- 
sign, and construct improvements to the Winthrop Wells, so called, and for 
related materiel and services; and further to transfer the same amount from the 
Stabilization Fund for said purposes; and further to rescind the $26,000 
appropriation in Article 15 of the 1976 Annual Town Meeting and to transfer 
said monies to the General Fund. Seconded. This article refers to the three 
Winthrop Wells. The Finance Committee recommended — Mr. Pszenny 
said that the status of the Winthrop Wells has been shaky for the past two 
years; we have invested a substantial amount of money in them and while he 
agrees that a long-term solution is necessary, he feels that in the short term 
we must have something and that would be wells that can provide us with 
water until the reservoir is a reality. He does not feel that we should throw 
away the money we have already put into these wells. On a two-thirds vote, 
the motion passed 370-16. 

Article 23: To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of 
money in addition to the sums raised and appropriated at Town Meetings 
held in 1976 and 1977 for public water supply purposes; to acquire easements 
and/or any other interests as may be necessary, either by purchase, gift, 
lease, eminent domain, or otherwise; and to complete the survey design, 
construction of, and the acquisition of related materiel and services for a 
well or wells for the public water supply to be located off the Essex Road; 
to determine whether such appropriation shall be raised by borrowing or 
otherwise; or to take any other action relative thereto. 

22 



Article 23: Mr. Damon moved that the Town vote to raise and appropriate 
the sum of $184,200 in addition to the sums raised and appropriated at Town 
Meetings held in 1976 and. 1977 for public water supply purposes; to acquire 
easements and/or any other interests as may be necessary, either by purchase, 
gift, lease, eminent domain, or otherwise; and to complete the survey design, 
construction of, and the acquisition of related materiel and services for a 
well or wells for the public water supply to be located off Essex Road; and 
further to raise this appropriation, the Treasurer, with the approval of the 
Board of Selectmen, be authorized to issue $184,200 in bonds or notes under 
Massachusetts General Laws, Chapters 44, sections 8(3) and 8(5), as amend- 
ed. Seconded. At this point we have received approval from the Department 
of Environmental Quality Engineering to go ahead with construction; the 
total cost of this well is $375,000, appropriated over the past three years. 
The Finance Committee was 8-0-1 in favor, with Mr. Emery stating that 
the important part is that this well has been tested and all it needs is to be 
tied in. We have just turned down the possibility of another better well that 
would take at least three years to go on line. Mr. Pechilis stated that the 
Town is definitely going to court on the Raymond land, because he wants 
double what the Town wants to give him. The land damage figure has to be 
added in to the total cost. David Warner felt the well should be put on the 
line because we do need a short-term solution. Stanley Kowolski felt it would 
be a senseless waste of money not to finish this well at this point. Mr. Pimen- 
tal said he was pleased with the response in favor of a long-term solution, and 
this well will be expensive but a good buy while waiting for that solution. 
On a two-thirds vote, the motion carried 429-9. 

Article 24: To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of 
money to paint and/or repair the Town water tanks and to acquire such 
materiel and services as may be necessary therefor; and to determine whether 
such monies shall be raised by borrowing or otherwise; or to take any other 
action relative thereto. 

Article 24: Mr. Pickard moved that the Town vote to raise and appropriate 
the sum of $29,250 to paint and repair the Town Water Tank located in the 
vicinity of the Great Neck, and to acquire such materiel and services as may 
be necessary therefor. Seconded. Finance Committee recommended. The 
motion carried on a voice vote. 

Article 25: To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of 
money to make* major maintenance repairs, renovations, alterations and 
additions to existing public schools; to determine whether such appropriation 
shall be raised by borrowing or otherwise; or to take any other action with 
respect thereto. 

Article 25: Mrs. Manning moved that $148,000 be appropriated for remodel- 
ing, reconstructing, and making extraordinary repairs to the existing schools 
of the Town and that to meet this appropriation the Treasurer, with the 
approval of the Board of Selectmen, be authorized to borrow $148,000 
under General Laws, Chapter 44, section 7 (3A) as amended. Seconded. 
This is the third year the School Department has asked for money for this 
type of repair, and this year work will be done on the High and Jr. High 
Schools. Finance Committee recommended. On a two-thirds vote, the motion 
carried 334-11. 



23 



Article 26: To hear and act upon the reports of committees, and to continue 
such committees as the Town may vote to continue. 

Article 26: Moved-by Irving Small that the report of the Government Study 
Committee be accepted and the committee continued. Seconded. Unanimous 
voice vote. 

Moved by John Conley that the Historic District Study Committee report 
be accepted and the committee continued. Seconded. Unanimous voice vote. 

Moved by Alice Keenan that the Mosquito Control Committee report 
be accepted and the committee continued. Seconded. Motion carried. 

Moved by William Craft that the report of the School Building Needs 
Committee be accepted and the committee continued. Seconded. Unanimous 
voice vote. 

Moved by George Mathey that the report of the Police Station Study 
Committee be accepted and the committee continued. Seconded. Unanimous 
voice vote. 

Moved by Leland Carter tha* the report of the Ipswich Commuter Rail 
Transportation Advisory Committee be accepted and the committee contin- 
ued. Seconded. Unanimous voice vote. 

Article 27: To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of 
money in addition to the sum appropriated by the 1977 Annual Town Meet- 
ing for the remodeling and reconstruction of the Town Hall Annex for a 
Police Station; to determine whether such appropriation shall be raised by 
borrowing or otherwise; or to take any other action relative thereto. 

Article 27: Mrs. Robertson moved that the Town vote to raise and appro- 
priate the sum of $95,000 in addition to the sum appropriated by the 1977 
Annual Town Meeting for remodeling and reconstruction of the Town Hall 
Annex for a police station; and that to meet this appropriation the Treasurer, 
with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, be authorized to issue bonds or 
notes under Chapter 44, section 7 (3A) of the Massachusetts General Laws, 
as amended; and further, that the Town vote to appropriate the sum of 
$18,400 in addition to the aforementioned sums and to transfer said $18,400 
from the stabilization fund for said purposes. Seconded. Mr. Nagus 
reported that the Finance Committee recommended this article; more than 25 
years have passed since the first request for a new police station was made. 
Police functions and services are much more complex and a new facility is 
badly needed. Mr. Mathey said it is not right for both the Police and the 
public dealing with them to have no privacy. He was the one who under- 
estimated the budget last year; inflation plus damages done by the severe 
winter just past has pushed up costs. Mr. Pechilis opposed the motion and 
felt that the Town By-laws were being subverted, suggesting that the 
Committee knew costs would be over $100,000 and that if the total sum was 
put on a ballot, it would be defeated. The Board of Selectmen, on a 3-2 vote, 
agreed to appropriate money and take from the Stabilization Fund; he didn't 
feel it was proper. He felt that we do need a new police station but would like 
to see it voted properly. Chief Brouillette said that the annex had been offer- 
ed to the Police Department three years ago but before anything could be 
done, the new Accounting Department computer was put in there and all 



24 



the other departments moved over with it. The Police Department was left 
where it was. This plan calls for a basic, functional police department and he 
thanked the members of the Committee who worked so hard. He asked 
that Town Counsel rule on the legality of the article. Town Counsel Charles 
Dalton ruled that the motion was not illegal since the sum to be raised by 
bond was not over $100,000. Mr. Pimentel felt that the Committee was 
honorable and were not trying to pull the wool over the voters' eyes last year 
when they asked for $95,000. On a motion made to move the question, 
seconded, it was carried unanimously. On the main motion with a two-thirds 
vote needed, the motion passed with 319 voting in the affirmative, 38 in the 
negative. 

Article 28: To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of 
money in addition to the sum authorized to be expended from Anti- 
Recessionary Federal Revenue Sharing Funds by the 1977 Annual Town 
Meeting, for the purpose of completing renovations and repairs to the Town 
Hall and obtaining all materiel and services as may be necessary and inciden- 
tal thereto; and to further authorize a change in the application of the re- 
maining balance of the said 1977 appropriation from "storm windows" 
and "insulation" to renovations and repairs; to determine whether said 
appropriation shall be raised by borrowing or otherwise; or to take any 
other action relative thereto. 

Article 28: Mrs. Robertson moved that the Town vote to raise and appro- 
priate the sum of $56,000 in addition to the sum authorized to be expended 
from Anti-recessionary Federal Revenue Sharing Funds by the 1977 Annual 
Town Meeting, for the purpose of completing renovations and repairs to the 
Town Hall and obtaining all materiel and services as may be necessary and 
incidental thereto; and further, to authorize a change in the application of 
the remaining balance of the said 1977 appropriation from "storm windows" 
and "insulation" to renovations and repairs, and to raise this appropria- 
tion, the Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, be authoriz- 
ed to borrow $56,000 under Chapter 44, section 7(3A) of the General Laws 
as amended. Seconded. This will make for full utilization of the second floor 
of the Town Hall and will put all the departments back into the building. 
Finance Committee recommended unanimously, with Mr. Emery stating 
that we will have a reasonable and functional building. The motion carried 
247-33 on a two-thirds vote. 

Article 29: To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of 
money for the purpose of surveying, designing and constructing an exten- 
sion of the sanitary sewer system in the area of Wood's Lane, Grant Court 
and Poplar Street, or any portion thereof, and to authorize the Board of 
Selectmen as Sewer Commissioners to acquire such easements and/or other 
interest(s) as may be necessary to effectuate said extension of the sanitary 
sewer system by purchase, gift, lease, eminent domain, or otherwise; to 
determine whether such appropriation shall be raised by borrowing or other- 
wise; or to take any other action relative thereto. 

Article 29: Mrs. Robertson moved that the Town appropriate the sum of 
$139,500 for the purpose of surveying, designing, constructing and obtain- 
ing related materiel and services for an extension of the sanitary sewer system 
in the area of Wood's Lane, Grant Court, and Poplar Street in Ipswich, or 
any portion thereof; and to authorize the Board of Selectmen to acquire such 
easements and/or other interest(s) as may be necessary to effectuate said 

25 



extensions of the sanitary sewer system by purchase, gift, lease, eminent 
domain, or otherwise; and further to raise this appropriation, the Treasurer, 
with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, be authorized to issue $139,500 
in bonds oj notes under Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 
8(15) as amended. Seconded. Mrs. Robertson said that this area has had very 
severe sewerage problems for several years, with sewerage running in the 
streets and standing in foul pools; all the residents have signed petitions and 
have attended meetings of the Selectmen and Board of Health to urge relief. 
George Tsoutsouras informed the meeting that the Finance Commitee 
recommended this article unanimously. Wood's Lane resident Mrs. Vivian 
Endicott, Health Agent Deborah Stone, Walter Ziemlak all urged passage. 
With a two-thirds vote needed, the motion carried 264-1 . 

It having reached 1 1 :00 p.m., it was moved, seconded and voted to recess 
until 7:30 p.m. on Tuesday, May 2, 1978. 

At 7:30 p.m. on Tuesday, May 2nd, there being no quorum present, it 
was moved, seconded and voted to postpone the meeting until 7:45. At 7:45 
with still no quorum it was moved, seconed and voted to postpone the 
opening until 8:00. At 8:00 the meeting was recessed once more until 8:15 at 
which time a quorum was present and the meeting began. 

Tellers appointed by the Moderator were: John Stella, Elton McCausland, 
Jeffrey LaMarca, Philip Stewart, and Joanne Babson. The final count 
showed 343 voters present. 

Article 30: To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of 
money for the purpose of surveying, designing and constructing an exten- 
sion of the sanitary sewer system in the area of Newmarch Street, from the 
area of Jeffrey's Neck Road to a point approximately one hundred feet east 
of Jurdin Hill Road, or any portion thereof, to authorize the Board of Select- 
men as Sewer Commissioners to acquire such easements and/or other in- 
terests) as may be necessary to effectuate said extension of the sanitary 
sewer system by purchase, gift, lease, eminent domain, or otherwise; to 
determine whether such appropriation shall be raised by borrowing or other- 
wise; or to take any other action relative thereto. 

Article 30: Mr. Pechilis moved that the Town vote to appropriate the sum 
of $167,500 for the purpose of surveying, designing and constructing and 
obtaining related materiel and services for an extension of the sanitary sewer 
system in the area of Newmarch Street from the area of Jeffrey's Neck Road 
to a point approximately one hundred feet east of Jurdin Hill Road, or 
any portion thereof; and to authorize the Board of Selectmen to acquire 
such easements and/or other interest(s) as may be necessary to effectuate 
said extension of the sanitary sewer system by purchase, gift, lease, eminent 
domain, or otherwise; and further to raise this appropriation the Treasurer, 
with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, be authorized to issue $167,500 
in bonds or notes under Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 44, section 
8(15) as amended; and further to authorize the Board of Selectmen to apply 
for, accept, and expend any Federal or State grants, private gifts, and any 
interest as may be earned thereon to effectuate said purpose. Seconded. 
This is a situation similar to the Wood's Lane problem; 60-70 people are 
involved, many of whom have spent a great deal of money to try to correct 
their sewage problems. Passage of this article will add 56 cents to the tax 
rate, according to Mr. Pechilis. George Hayes said the Finance Committee 

26 



did not recommend, feeling that there must be a limit on haphazard sewering 
and with the updating of the Master Plan, we will get a better picture of 
priorities. Dr. Marsh spoke for water conservation, Mr. Damon, David 
Warner and William McKinney spoke against the article, Messrs. Pimentel 
and Pickard in favor. On a two-thirds vote, the motion was defeated 38-221 . 

Article 31: To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of 
money for the purpose of surveying, designing, and constructing an exten- 
sion of the sanitary sewer system in the area of Argilla Road, and to author- 
ize the Board of Selectmen as Sewer Commissioners to acquire such easements 
and/or other interest(s) as may be necessary to effectuate said extension of 
the sanitary sewer system by purchase, gift, lease, eminent domain, or other- 
wise; to determine whether such appropriation shall be raised by borrowing 
or otherwise; or to take any other action relative thereto. 

Article 31: Mr. Pickard moved that the Town vote to raise and appropriate 
the sum of $21,000 for the purpose of surveying, designing, and constructing 
and obtaining related materiel and services for an extension of the sanitary 
sewer system in the area of Argilla Road, a distance of approximately 300 
hundred feet (300'); and to authorize the Board of Selectmen to acquire 
such easements and/or other interests(s) as may be necessary to effectuate 
said extension of the sanitary sewer system by purchase, gift, lease, eminent 
domain, or otherwise; and further to raise this appropriation, the Treasurer, 
with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, be authorized to issue $21 ,000 
in bonds or notes under Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 44, section 
8(15) as amended. Seconded. This is another major septic problem area. 
Mr. Emery said the Finance Committee was unanimously against this article, 
and would like to see a progressive sewerage program to spend about $100,000 
a year to agree with the Master Plan. Police Chief Armand Brouillette, 
whose house would be one of those sewered, asked that the article be passed, 
reminding that when the sewer was put down Argilla Road it was supposed to 
go past his property but for some unknown reason was stopped 300' from 
where it was to end. Mrs. Robertson spoke in favor, as did Brian Brouillette, 
whose house would also be sewered. On a two-thirds vote, the motion passed 
167-84. The vote was questioned, since 167 votes were needed to pass, and 
on advice of Town Counsel, the Moderator asked for a recount. It was so 
moved, seconded and carried. On the vote, the motion was defeated 183-105. 

Article 32: To see if the Town will vote (1) to rescind its vote on Article 63 
of the 1966 Annual Town Meeting, which article authorized borrowing 
monies for an extension of the sanitary sewer system along Mile Lane, (2) to 
rescind its vote on Article 19 of the 1973 Annual Town Meeting to the extent 
of the remaining balance of monies authorized to be borrowed for cleaning 
and cement-lining water lines, and (3) to rescind its vote on Article 18 of the 
1975 Annual Town Meeting to the extent of the remaining balance of monies 
authorized to be borrowed for extending the sanitary sewer system along 
Avery Street and Dornell Road; or to take any other action relative thereto. 

Article 32: Mr. Pickard moved that the Town (1) rescind its vote on Article 
63 o( the 1966 Annual Town Meeting, which article authorized borrowing 
$343,000 and raised $7,000 for an extension of the sanitary sewer system 
along Mile Lane and that $7,000 be returned to surplus revenue, (2) rescind 
its vote on Article 19 of the 1973 Annual Town Meeting to the extent of the 
$160,000 remaining balance of monies authorized to be borrowed for clean- 
ing and cement-lining water lines, and (3) rescind its vote on Article 18 of 

27 



the 1975 Annual Town Meeting to the extent of the $54,400 remaining balance 
of monies authorized to be borrowed for extending the sanitary sewer system 
along Avery Street and Dornell Road. Seconded. Finance Committee 
recommended. The motion carried on a voice vote. 

Article 33: To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of 
money to engage engineering services and to obtain materiel and services 
necessary and incident to preparing a State and Federal Step One Community 
Facilities plan or plans for sewer interceptors, collectors and/or laterals, and 
for locating infiltration and/or inflow of ground water and surface waters 
into the Town's sanitary sewer system; to authorize the Board of Selectmen 
to furnish such information and take such other action as may be necessary 
to qualify for and use federal and/or state grants for the above mentioned 
purposes; to authorize the Town to accept and expend any grants, planning 
advancements or reimbursements for preliminary planning received by the 
Town on these projects; to agree that if such grants, advances, or reimburse- 
ments are made the Tow n will pay all of the remaining costs of the approved 
project over and above the amount of the grant(s); to determine whether said 
monies shall be raised by borrowing or otherwise; or to take any other action 
relative thereto. 

Article 33: Mr. Pimentel moved that the Town vote to raise and appro- 
priate the sum of $59,500 to engage engineering services and to obtain 
materiel and services necessary and incident to preparing a State and Federal 
Step One Community Facilities plan or plans for sewer interceptors, collect- 
ors and/or laterals, and for locating infiltration and/or inflow of ground 
water and surface waters into the Town sanitary sewer system; to authorize 
the Board of Selectmen to furnish such information and take such other 
action as may be necessary to qualify for and use Federal and/or State grants 
for the above-mentioned purposes; to authorize the Town to accept and ex- 
pend any grants, planning advancements or reimbursements for preliminary 
planning received by the Town on these projects; to agree that if such grants, 
advances, or reimbursements are made, the Town will pay all of the remain- 
ing costs of the approved project over and above the amount of the grant(s); 
and further, to raise this appropriation the Treasurer, with the approval of 
the Board of Selectmen, be authorized to borrow $59,500 in anticipation of 
State and Federal grants in order to make monthly payments for engineering 
services and other incidental costs for said purposes. Seconded. Mr. Pimentel 
stated that the purpose of this motion is to inventory and evaluate the cap- 
acity of existing sewers and to correct defects. It will help us to plan and 
fund sewer improvements in an orderly way. Mr. Tsoutsouras said that the 
Finance Committee unanimously recommended the article, as we really need 
the plan. Nathaniel Pulsifer asked if the third from the last sentence could 
be a blank check? Town Manager George Howe said that it wasn't intended 
as such. David Warner and James Marr both spoke on the motion. The 
question was moved, seconded and carried. On a two-thirds vote, the motion 
was carried with 220 voting in the affirmative and 36 in the negative. 

Article 34: To see if the Town will vote to amend the By-Laws, Chapter 
XV, by adding the following new section 10: 

"Section 10. Water use Restriction and Restraint — The Board of Water 
Commissioners may upon seven (7) says' notice to the public by new spaper 
publication and after a public hearing restrict or restrain the use of water 
in any manner on public and/or private premises by any means, including 

28 



by shutting off the water or the curb cock, during a drought, hurricane, 
conflagration, or other disaster when in the opinion of the department of 
public health an emergency exists. No person shall violate any such restriction 
or restraint while same remains in effect. ,, 

Article 34: Mr. Pimentel moved that the Town amend its By-laws by adding 
a new Section 10 to Chapter XV: "Section 10. Water Use Restriction and 
Restraint 

The Board of Water Commissioners may upon seven (7) days' notice to 
the public by newspaper publication" and after a public hearing restrict or 
restrain the use of water in any manner on public and/or private premises by 
any means, including by shutting off the water or the curb cock, during a 
drought, hurricane, conflagration or other disaster when in the opinion of 
the Department of Environmental Quality Engineering an emergency exists. 
No person shall violate any such restriction or restraint while same remains 
in effect." Seconded. This addition will give us a bit more clout in enforcing 
water bans. Finance Committee recommended. George Scott asked for 
clarification regarding people having their own private water system. On Mr. 
Dalton's suggestion, it was moved to add "public" to the title, i.e., "Public 
Water Use Restriction and Restraint" and also to change "use of water in 
any manner" to "use of public water supply in any manner," seconded, 
and so voted. The motion carried on a voice vote. Bruce Paul questioned 
the use of Department of Environmental Quality Engineering rather than 
Department of Public Health; we no longer have authority to call state of 
emergency, we have to get permission from the State. 

Article 35: To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of 
money for engineering services and for related materiel and services necessary 
and incidental to surveying the Dow's reservoir and the Town's water mains 
to locate such leaks as may exist; to determine whether such appropriation 
shall be raised by borrowing or otherwise; or to take any other action relative 
thereto. 

Article 35: Mr. Pimentel moved that the Town vote to raise and appropriate 
the sum of $11,000 for engineering services and for related materiel and 
services necessary and incidental to surveying the Dow's Reservoir and the 
Town's water mains to locate such leaks as may exist. Secnded. This is an 
attempt to begin to remedy some of our water problems. The Finance Com- 
mittee was 7-2 in favor. The motion carried on a voice vote. 

Article 36: To see if the Town will by vote determine that the proportion of 
the cost of systems of sewerage and sewage disposal which shall be paid by 
the Town shall be fifty percentum (50%) under the provisions of Section 7 
of Chapter 30 of the Acts of 1946 and to rescind any inconsistent action of 
any prior Town Meeting; or to take any other action relative thereto. 

Article 36: Mr. Pechilis moved that the Town vote to determine that the 
proportion of the cost of systems of sewerage and sewage disposal which 
shall be paid by the Town shall be fifty percentum (50%) under the pro- 
visions of Section 7 of Chapter 30 of the Acts of 1946 and to rescind any 
inconsistent action of any prior Town Meeting. Seconded. Mr. Pechilis 
explained that at present, property owners pay a betterment charge of $7.20 
per foot for the sewer, the Town also pays $7.20 for a total of $14.40. The 
Town can increase these charges to between 33% and 75%, and would like to 

29 



raise it to 50% of average costs. John Griffin of the Finance Committee 
stated that the Town is currently violating a State law on this matter, and 
his committee is unanimously in favor of the article. The Town Manager 
clarified the method of arriving at an average for Chief Brouillette and Mr. 
Warner, and Mr. Emery spoke on the motion. The motion carried. 

Article 37: To see if the Town will vote to accept the provisions of Chapter 
586 of the Acts of 1977, making certain unpaid annual sewer service charges 
a municipal lien; or to take any other action relative thereto. 

Article 37: Mr. Damon moved that the Town vote to accept the provisions 
of Chapter 586 of the Acts of 1977, making certain unpaid annual sewer 
service charges a municipal lien. Seconded. This article would bring an exist- 
ing practice into conformity with State statutes. Those owners who don't pay 
their water and sewer bills will have a lien placed on their property by the 
Town. Finance Committee recommended. The motion carried. 

Article 38: To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of 
money to connect private estates to the municipal sewer system pursuant to 
Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 83, Sections 3, 1 1 and 24, as amended 
and pursuant to Town of Ipswich By-Laws Chapter XV, Section 9; to deter- 
mine whether such appropriation shall be raised by borrowing or otherwise; 
or to take any other action relative thereto. 

Article 38: Mr. Damon moved that the Town vote to raise and appropriate 
the sum of $25,000 to connect private estates to the municipal sewer system 
pursuant to Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 83, Sections 3, 11 and 24, 
as amended, and pursuant to Town of Ipswich By-laws, Chapter XV, Section 
9. Seconded. This is an attempt to correct a health problem involving 22 
homes, 11 of which are estimated to have large problems, where the sewer 
is available but connections have not been made. The Board of Health has 
given these properties exemptions. Liens will be put on the properties which 
must be paid within ten years or at the time of sale. Finance Committee 
7-1-1 against the motion, feeling this would be a very sensitive and precedent- 
setting procedure in determining "hardship," and suggested the Sewer 
Commissioners should get their act together before the Town rushes into 
this; Mr. Damon replied that it was the Board of Health, not the Sewer 
Commissioners, who had authority in this matter. Mr. Nagus retorted that 
the Finance Committee had been told it was the Sewer Commissioners. Mr. 
Pechilis said the Board of Selectmen are the enforcing agency, and liens 
are difficult to keep track of. The motion was defeated on a voice vote. 

Article 39: To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of 
money to supplement the FY 1979 Annual Budget appropriation to fund a 
contract to collect, transport, and dispose of the Town's municipal solid 
wastes at some location out-of-Town, for Fiscal Year 1979; to raise and 
appropriate a sum of money to purchase, construct, and install related mat- 
eriel and to obtain related services for a central refuse collection station; or 
to take any other action relative thereto. 

Article 39: Mr. Damon moved that the Town vote to raise and appropriate 
the sum of $68,050 to supplement the FY 1979 Annual Budget appropriation 
to fund a contract to collect, transport, and dispose o( the Town's municipal 
solid wastes at some location out of town, for FY 1979 and to purchase, 



30 



construct and install related materiel and to obtain related services lor a 
central refuse collection station. Seconded. This will enable us to clean up 
after ourselves after the State forces us to close the dump on July 1st. The 
Finance Committee recommended with Mr. Pszenny stating that there was 
no alternative at this time but to have the trash taken out of town. The 
motion carried on a voice vote. 

Article 40: To see whether the Town under and pursuant to authority granted 
in General Laws Chapter 40D, Section 21(g), as amended, will authorize the 
Board of Selectmen at their discretion to negotiate a contract with the op- 
erator of a solid waste disposal facility for the disposal of refuse, garbage 
and waste and for the use of by-products resulting from the operation of 
such facilities, which contract may 

(1) be for a term of twenty years, more or less, or a lesser period; 

(2) include provisions for the delivery of minimum amounts of refuse, 
garbage and waste and payments for the use of the facilities to be based 
thereon; 

(3) provide for unit prices that will be graduated and for adjustments 
thereof and for the use of steam, electricity and other by-products result- 
ing from the use of the facilities and for credits or payments to the Town 
resulting therefrom; 

(4) provide for use by the Town or other municipalities of the uncommitted 
capacity of such facilities; 

(5) contain other provisions incidental and related to the foregoing general 
matters; and 

(6) be generally in the form of a proposed contract negotiated by repre- 
sentatives of the member communities of the North-east Solid Waste 
Committee (NESWC) with any changes therein whatsoever as may be approv- 
ed by said Board of Selectmen; which contract shall be submitted to the 
voters of the Town for approval by majority vote; and To see whether the 
Town under and pursuant to authority granted in General Laws Chapter 
40D, Section 21(g), as amended, will authorize the Board of Selectmen at their 
discretion to negotiate a contract with the operator of a solid waste re- 
source recovery disposal facility for the disposal of refuse, garbage and 
waste and for the use of by-products resulting from the operation of the 
facility, which contract may: 

(1) be for a term of twenty years, more or less, or any lesser period. 

(2) include provisions for the delivery of minimum amounts of refuse, 
garbage and waste and payments for the use of the facility to be based there- 
on; 

(3) provide for unit prices that may be graduated and for adjustments 
thereof based upon the proceeds of sale of steam, electricity and other re- 
sources resulting or recovered from the use of the facility; 

(4) provide for use by the Town or other municipalities of the uncommitted 
capacity of such facility; and 

(5) contain other provisions incidental and related to the foregoing general 
matters; which contract shall be submitted to the voters of the Town for 
approval by majority vote; or to take any other action relative thereto. 



Article 40: Mrs. Robertson moved that the Town vote under and pursuant to 
authority granted in General Laws, Chapter 40D, section 21(g), as amended, 
to authorize the Board of Selectmen at their discretion to negotiate a contract 
with the operator of a solid waste disposal facility for the disposal of refuse, 

31 



garbage and waste and for the use of by-products resulting from the opera- 
tion of such facilities, which contract may 

1 ) be for a term of twenty years, more or less, or a lesser period; 

2) include provisions for the delivery of minimum amounts of refuse, 
garbage and waste and payments for the use of the facilities to be based 
thereon 

3) provide for unit prices that will be graduated and for adjustments 
thereof and for the use of steam, electricity and other by-products 
resulting from the use of the facilities and for credits or payments of the 
Town resulting therefrom; 

4) provide for use by the Town or other municipalities of the uncom- 
mited capacity of such facilities; 

5) contain other provisions incidental and related to the foregoing 
general matters; and 

6) be generally in the form of a proposed contract negotiated by repre- 
sentatives of the member communities of the Northeast Solid Waste 
Committee (NESWC) with any changes therein whatsoever as may be 
approved by said Board of Selectmen; which contract shall be sub- 
mitted to the voters of the Town for approval by majority vote; and 
vote under and pursuant to authority granted in General Laws Chapter 
40D, Section 21(g) as amended, to authorize the Board of Selectmen 
at their discretion to negotiate a contract with the operator of a solid 
waste resource recovery disposal facility for the disposal of refuse, 
garbage and waste and for the use of by-products resulting from 
the operation of the facility, which contract may: 

1) be for a term of twenty years, more or less, or any lesser period; 

2) include provisions for the delivery of minimum amounts of refuse, 
garbage and waste and payments for the use of the facility to be based 
thereon; 

3) provide for unit prices that may be graduated and for adjustments 
thereof based upon the proceeds of sale of steam, electricity and 
other resources resulting or recovered from the use of the facility; 

4) provide for use by the Town or other municipalities of the uncom- 
mitted capacity of such facility and 

5) contain other provisions incidental and related to the foregoing 
general matters; which contract shall be submitted to the voters of the 
Town for approval by majority vote. 

Seconded. Finance Committee recommended unanimously. The motion 
carried on a voice vote. 

At this point, Philip Stewart questioned the quorum, and the Moderator 
called for a count. It showed 299 voters in the hall, with 340 needed for a 
quorum. Mr. Pimentel moved that the meeting recess until Saturday morning 



32 



at 9:00 a.m. Seconded. When this was protested, Mr. Pimentel withdrew 
his motion and moved that the meeting recess until Wednesday evening, 
May 3rd at 7:30 p.m. Seconded. Motion carried and the meeting recessed 
at 10:10p.m. 

At 7:40 p.m. on Wednesday, May 3rd, the Moderator announced that 
the Meeting was 55 voters short of a quorum; it was moved, seconded and 
voted to postpone starting until 8:00 p.m. At 8:00 the Moderator announced 
that a quorum was present and the Meeting began. The final count was 445. 
Tellers appointed were: John Stella, Dean Palmer, James Engel, Elton Mc- 
Causland, Jeffrey LaMarca and Joanne Babson. 

Mr. Pimentel moved that Article 42 be considered after Article 53. Second- 
ed. Motion carried. 

Article 41: To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of 
money to engage engineering services and to acquire related materiel and 
services necessary and incidental to evaluating, surveying, and designing a 
site or sites for a sanitary landfill; to determine whether said monies shall 
be raised by borrowing or otherwise; or to take any other action relative 
thereto. 

Article 41: Mr. Pickard moved that the Town vote to raise and appropriate 
the sum of $45,750 to engage engineering services and to acquire related 
materiel and services necessary and incidental to evaluating, surveying, 
and designing a site or sites for a sanitary landfill. Seconded. The main 
sites involved in this motion would be Old Right Road and Paradise Road. 
James Smyth reported that the Finance Committee was opposed 7-2, feeling 
that this was a large amount of money for engineering surveys and there 
were no cost figures for site acquisition. The proposal should be deferred 
until there is more information available. Mrs. Robertson said that a majority 
of the Board of Selectmen were opposed to any landfill in Town. Theodore 
Powers told the Meeting that Old Right Road is his backyard; that the reason 
it was first on the list was largely political, and since Old Right Road is seven 
miles from Town and not near any water, he could not see any reason for 
a dump being put there. Mr. Damon felt that Mr. Powers had made a number 
of good points,, and there is no logic in spending money for another survey. 
The motion was defeated on a voice vote. 

Article 43: To see whether the Town will vote to amend the protective zoning 
By-Law of the Town of Ipswich, paragraphs IV-A, IV-B, V-D, and VI-G-2, 
relating to height restriction and to building requirements in the areas gen- 
erally known as Great Neck and Little Neck; copy of said Protective By- 
Law Amendment and Map referred to herein being on file in the Town 
Clerk's office; or to take any other action relative thereto. 

Article 43: Chairman of the Planning Board John Beagan moved that the 
Protective Zoning By-law of the Town of Ipswich, dated May 1977, be 
amended as follows: 

1. Under "Zoning Districts" in Section IV. A. striking "The Town of 
Ipswich is hereby divided into districts of five (5) types to be known 
as: 1. Rural Residence (RR) District" and inserting in place thereof 
"The Town of Ipswich is hereby divided into districts of six (6) types 
to be known as 1. Rural Residence Districts (RRA & RRB)." 

33 



2. Under "Zoning Districts" in Section IV. B striking "1. The Rural 
Residence District" and inserting in place thereof: "1. The Rural 
Residence Districts." 

3. Under "Use Regulations" Section V.D., "Table of Use Regulations" 
striking column headings "RR" and inserting in place thereof "RRA 
&RRB." 

4. Under "Dimensional and Density Regulations" Section VLB. "Table 
of Dimensional and Density Regulations" striking under "District," 
"Rural Residence" and inserting in place thereof "Rural Residence 
RRA&RRB." 

5. Under "Dimensional and Density Regulations" Section VI. G., para- 
graph 2, striking "In all districts buildings and structures may hereafter 
be erected or structurally altered to a height not exceeding three (3) 
stories or forty-five (45) feet;" and inserting in place thereof "Buildings 
and structures may hereafter be erected or structurally altered to 
heights not exceeding twenty-five (25) feet in the Rural Residence B 
(RBB) District and three (3) stories or forty-five (45) feet in all other 
Districts;" 

6. Changing the designation on the Zoning Map of the Town of Ipswich, 
Massachusetts, of all RR zones to RRA except for the area generally 
known as Great and Little Necks which shall be designated as RRB 
and bounded by a line starting at the mean low water mark on the north- 
erly beach or Great Neck, thence proceeding generally in an easterly, 
thence southerly, thence westerly and thence northerly direction 
continuously following said mean low water mark until that line inter- 
sects a line three hundred (300) feet westerly of and parallel to the cen- 
ter of Little Neck Road; thence continuing along that line in a north- 
westerly direction until it intersects with the southerly extension of 
the westerly property line of Lots #58 and #59 now or formely owned 
by the Proprietors of Great Neck; thence proceeding northerly along 
that property line and its expension, crossing Jeffrey's Neck Road 
until it intersects the point of the beginning; all as shown in a green 
color on the Zoning Map displayed at this meeting. 

7. On the Zoning Map of the Town of Ipswich, Massachusetts, striking 
"RR Rural Residence" and inserting in place thereof "RRA Rural 
Residence A" and*"RRB Rural Residence B" as shown of the Zoning 
Map displayed at this meeting. 

Seconded. Mr. Beagan stated that all we were doing was changing height 
restrictions on the Necks to 25' and the rest of the Town remains the same. 
This proposal was made by the Neck Association, which conducted a survey 
and found the majority of residents overwhelmingly in favor. Finance 
Committee recommended unanimously. The Neck area is the most densely 
populated in the Town and height restrictions are a logical step. Several 
Neck residents spoke on the article. On a two-thirds vote, the motion passed 
395-4. 

Article 44: To see whether the Town will vote to amend the protective zon- 
ing By-Law and Map of the Town of Ipswich by extending the southeaster- 
ly boundary of the business district on High Street in the general vicinity of 

34 



Kimball Avenue; said Protective By-Law Amendment and Map referred to 
herein being on file in the Town Clerk's Office; or to take any other action 
relative thereto. 

Article 44: Planning Board member Roger Burke moved that the Town vote 
to amend the Protective Zoning By-law and Map of the Town of Ipswich by 
extending the southwesterly boundary of the business district 300* parallel 
to and westerly of High Street (Rte. 1A and Rte. 133) to the center of Kim- 
ball Avenue and in an easterly direction to the intersection of the business 
district on the easterly side of High Street (Rte. 1A and Rte. 133), as shown 
on the map displayed at this Meeting. Seconded. Mr. Burke said that Articles 
43 and 44 constituted the report of the Planning Board. When the new By- 
law was written last year, this small area was put into Intown Residence 
rather than Business, and it was brought to the Board's attention by interest- 
ed citizens. This was a Business District in the previous By-law. Finance 
Committee unanimously recommended. Marion Reedy asked how far back 
into Kimball Avenue would the district extend; Mr. Burke replied that it 
would go back 300' from High Street. Lawrence Morse, who lives in the 
brick house on the corner and has had a law office in it, spoke in favor of 
the article, as did Brian Flynn. On a two-thirds vote, the motion passed 
347-23. 

Article 45: To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of 
money to engage engineering services and to acquire related materiel and 
services necessary and incidental to preparing plans, specifications for and 
conducting repairs to Town-owned and maintained bridges and to authorize 
the Board of Selectmen to apply for, accept, and expend any Federal and/or 
State grants as may be available for the aforementioned purposes; to author- 
ize the Board of Selectmen to acquire such easements and/or other interest(s) 
as may be necessary to effectuate said repairs, by purchase, gift, lease, emi- 
nent domain, or otherwise; or to take any other action relative thereto. 

Article 45: Mrs. Robertson moved that the Town vote to raise and appro- 
priate the sum of $15,000 to engage engineering services and to acquire 
related materiel and services necessary and incidental to preparing plans, 
specifications for and conducting repairs to Town-owned and maintained 
bridges and to authorize the Board of Selectmen to apply for, accept, and 
expend any Federal and/or State grants as may be available for the afore- 
mentioned purposes; and to authorize the Board of Selectmen to acquire 
such easements and/or other interest(s) as may be necessary to effectuate 
said repairs, by purchase, gift, lease, eminent domain, or otherwise. Seconded. 
Last year we appropriated money to examine six bridges in Ipswich. The 
study recommended repairs to all, and this appropriation will take care of 
repairs to the Fox Creek Bridge on Arilla Road. It is planned to appropriate 
$15,000 each year for the next six to eight years. Finance Committee was 
5-4 against the article, feeling it should be in an operating budget. On a 
two-thirds vote, the motion was defeated 75-247. 

Article 46: To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of 
monies to replace the bridge on Labor-in- Vain Road which crosses Labor-In- 
Vain Creek, and to authorize the Board of Selectmen to acquire such 
easements and/or other interest(s) as may be necessary by purchase, gift, 
lease, eminent domain, or otherwise to effectuate such replacement; to see 
if the Town shall raise the monies by borrowing or otherwise or to take any 
other action relative thereto. 

35 



Article 46: Mrs. Robertson moved for indefinite postponement, stating that 
we must move for indefinite postponement as we don't have any plans or 
specifications from the State for rebuilding Labor-in- Vain Bridge. Seconded. 
The motion carried on a voice vote. 

Article 47: To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen 
and/or the Town Manager to enter into a contract or contracts with the 
Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority pursuant to General Laws, 
Chapter 161A, Sections 3(j) and 5(j), for the provision of train service to 
the Town for the period July 1, 1978 through June 30, 1979, substantially 
as is in existence between the MBTA and the Town, with such changes, 
additions and deletions as the Town Manager, with the advice of Town 
Counsel and the Ipswich Commuter Rail Transportation Advisory Committee, 
may determine, and that a sum of money be raised and appropriated therefor; 
or to take any other action relative thereto. 

Article 47: Mr. Pimentel moved that the Town vote to authorize the Board 
of Selectmen and/or Town Manager to enter into a contract or contracts 
with the MBTA pursuant to General Laws, Chapter 161A, Sections 3(j) and 
5(j), for the provision of train service to the Town for the period July 1, 1978 
through June 30, 1979, substantially as is in existence between the MBTA 
and the Town, with such changes, additions, and deletions as the Town 
Manager, with the advice of Town Counsel and the Commuter Rail Trans- 
portation Advisory Committee, may determine and that the sum of $31,000 
be raised and appropriated therefor. Seconded. John Griffin said the Finance 
Committee recommended 8-1. Robert Weatherall spoke in favor. The motion 
carried on a voice vote. 

Article 48: To see what action the Town will take to appropriate a sum of 
money to purchase for conservation purposes a certain parcel of land in 
the Dow Brook Watershed of approximately 19 acres believed to be owned 
by George W. and Phyllis E. Bruce; to see whether the Town shall raise the 
money by borrowing or otherwise; or to take any action relative thereto. 

Article 48: Sarah Weatherall moved that the Town vote to acquire for con- 
servation purposes to be managed and controlled by the Conservation 
Commission in accordance with Chapter 40, Section 8C a certain parcel of 
land believed to be owned by George W. and Phyllis E. Bruce situated on 
the westerly side of High Street in Ipswich, Massachusetts, being bounded 
and described as follows: Beginning at the most northerly corner thereof 
at an iron pipe, said pipe being the common corner of land of John P. Flynn, 
inhabitant of the Town of Ipswich, and grantor; thence running S 51 °-13'-33" 
E by land of said Ipswich one hundred eighty-five and eighty-seven hundredths 
feet (185.87') to a drill hole; thence running S 58°-40'-56" E by land of 
said Ipswich four hundred fifty-seven and sixty-nine hundredths feet (457.69') 
to a drill hole concrete bound; thence running S 26°-50'-07" W by land 
of Hubert Gaspar ninety-eight and ninety-five hundredths feet (98.95') to a 
drill hole in a stone wall; thence running S 27°-20'-24" W along said wall 
by land of said Gaspar five hundred twenty-one and twenty-two hundredths 
feet (521.22') to a drill hole; thence running S 28°-16'-23" W along said 
wall by land of said Gaspar one hundred eighty-eight and eighty-two hundred- 
ths feet (188.82') to a drill hole; thence turning and running S 37°-42'-30" 
W along said wall by land of said Gaspar twenty-one and ninety-seven 
hundredths feet (21 .97') to a drill, hole; thence turning and running S 62°-l 1 '-57" 
W along said wall by land of said Gaspar twenty-two and forty-three hun- 

36 



dredths feet (22.43') to a drill hole; thence turning and running S 81 -54'-45" 
W along said wall by land of said Gaspar three hundred seventy-nine and 
eight tenths feet (379.80') to a drill hole; thence turning and running S 81 °-36'-27" 
W along said wall by land of said Gaspar two hundred fifty-four and ninety- 
five hundredths feet (245.95') to a drill hole; thence turning and running S 
72°-29'-44" W along said wall by land of said Gaspar one hundred twenty- 
five and twenty-two hundredths feet (125.22') to a drill hole; thence turning 
and running N 71 °-58'-26" W along said wall by land of said Gaspar fifteen 
and seventy-three hundredths feet (15.73') to a drill hole; thence turning and 
running N 51 °-38'-44" W along said wall by land of said Gaspar two hundr- 
ed one and nineteen hundredths feet (201.19') to a drill hole; thence turning 
and running N 36°-08'-22" E along a stone wall by land of said John P. 
Flynn three hundred ninety-four and seven tenths feet (394.70') to a drill 
hole; thence turning and running N 37°-59'-35" E along said wall by land 
of said Flynn forty-three and nine hundredths feet (43.09') to a drill hole; 
thence turning and running N 35°-10'-37" E along said wall by land of said 
Flynn four hundred eighty and sixty-six hundredths feet (480.66') to a drill 
hole; thence turning and running N 37 °-13'-50" E along said wall by land of 
said Flynn fifty and two hundredths feet (50.02') to a drill hole; thence turn- 
ing and running N 35 °-42'-17" E along said wall by land of said Flynn one 
hundred sixty-five and sixty-four feet (165.64') to a drill hole at the end of 
said wall; thence turning and running N 35 °-40'-52" E along the remains of 
a wire fence by land of said Flynn two hundred nineteen and sixty-four 
hundredths feet (219.64') to an iron pipe the point of beginning. Containing 
19.1 acres and being shown as Lot 1 on a plan entitled in part "Plan of Land 
in Ipswich, Mass. Surveyed for Ipswich Conservation Commission, Scale 
1" = 50', April 21, 1978"; that the Town authorize the Conservation 
Commission to expend $9,500 from the Conservation Fund for this purpose, 
and that the Town authorize the Conservation Commission to act on be- 
half of the Town in securing State and/or Federal assistance and to enter 
into any contract in relation thereto, with the express understanding that 
any reimbursement of State and Federal funds for this project will be re- 
turned to the Conservation Fund. Seconded. The State requires Town Meet- 
ing approval for self-help funds, and the Town must have open space plans. 
This land will make a lovely addition to the watershed and recreational 
facilities. Finance Committee unanimously recommended, with Mr. Pzsenny 
saying that this will not cost the Town anything on the tax rate since the 
money is in the Special Fund of the Conservation Commission. The Board 
of Selectmen unanimously supported. Mr. Gaspar, an abutter, asked if the 
surveying stakes or the stone wall was the boundary. Mrs. Weatherall stat- 
ed that the orange stakes marked the boundary. On a two-thirds vote, the 
motion carried 330 voting in the affirmative, 7 in the negative. 

Article 49: To see if the Town will vote under the provisions of Massachu- 
setts General Laws Chapter 40, Section 5D, as amended to establish a special 
fund for retirement purposes to be used only to offset the anticipated future 
cost of funding the contributory retirement system to which the employees 
of the Town of Ipswich belong; see if the Town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate a sum of money to be deposited in said special fund; or to take any 
other action relative thereto. 

Article 49: Mr. Pechilis moved for indefinite postponement, as there wasn't 
enough information available. Seconded. Motion carried. 



37 



Article 50: To see if the Town will vote to amend the By-Laws, Chapter XI, 
by adding a new section 13 as follows: 

"Section 13. Optional Purchasing Procedure — When the estimated 
amount of a proposed contract for the purchase of materiel, supplies or 
equipment, or for any work or service to be performed for the Town (other 
than services of architects or other services of a professional nature or service 
performed by a person regularly employed by the Town as a part of the 
duties of such employment) exceeds $2,000 proposals shall be called for in 
the manner provided in Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 40:4B, except 
as otherwise specifically authorized in writing by the Board of Selectmen, 
provided that the last mentioned exception shall not apply when the esti- 
mated amount of such contract exceeds $3,500, or such authorization is 
limited or prohibited by statute. 

Article 50: Mr. Pechilis moved that the Town amend the By-laws, Chapter 
XI, by adding a new Section 13 as follows: "Section 13. Optional Purchas- 
ing Procedure 

When the estimated amount of a proposed contract for the purchase of 
material, supplies or equipment, or for any work or service to be performed 
for the Town (other than services of architects or other services of a profession- 
al nature or service performed by a person regularly employed by the Town 
as a part of the duties of such employment) exceeds $2,000, proposals shall 
be called for in the manner provided in Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 
40:4B except as otherwise specifically authorized in writing by the Board of 
Selectmen, provided that the last-mentioned exception shall not apply when 
the estimated amount of such contract exceeds $3,500, or such authorization 
is limited or prohibited by statute.'' Seconded. Finance Committee re- 
commended. Motion carried. 

Article 51: To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Select- 
men or their designate to apply for, accept and expend such grant or grants 
as may become available from the United States Federal Disaster Assistance 
Administration and/or the Federal Highway Administration to effect repairs 
and replacements for property damage sustained during February, 1978; 
or to take any other action relative thereto. 

Article 51: Mr. Pickard moved that the Town vote to authorize the Board 
of Selectmen or their designate to apply for, accept and expend such grant 
or grants as may become available from the United States Federal Disaster 
Assistance Administration and/or the Federal Highway Administration to 
effect repairs and replacements for property damage sustained during Feb- 
ruary 1978. Seconded. Finance Committee recommended. The motion 
carried on a voice vote. 

Article 52: To see if the Town will vote to authorize the transfer of a sum 
of monies from the Snow Removal Reimbursement-Disaster Relief Account 
to offset the deficit incurred in the Fiscal Year 1978 snow and ice control 
account; or to take any other action relative thereto. 

Article 52: Mr. Pickard moved that the Town vote to authorize the transfer 
of $27,830 from the Snow Removal Reimbursement-Disaster Relief account 
to offset the deficit incurred in the Fiscal Year 1978 Snow and Ice Control 
account. Seconded. Finance Committee recommended. The motion carried 
on a voice vote. 

38 



Article 53: To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Select- 
men to sell a certain building, commonly known as the ' 'Heard House" 
located on a certain parcel of real estate owned by the town on South Main 
Street and adjacent to the Town Hall, said sale not to include any of such 
real estate, or to take any other action relative thereto 

Article 53: Mr. Pechilis moved that the Town vote to authorize the Board 
of Selectmen to sell a certain building, commonly known as the "Heard 
House" or "Hall Hastings House," located on a certain parcel of land owned 
by the Town on South Main Street and adjacent to the Town Hall, said sale not 
to include any of said land and with the provision that whoever purchases 
the house be required to relocate it within the boundaries of the Town of 
Ipswich. Seconded. Mr. Pechilis stated that several years ago, the Town 
bought this property for future municipal parking or expansion; the build- 
ing is in a deplorable state. The recent proposal to turn it into a Drop-In 
Center for the Elderly, using HUD funds, is not a good one; the building 
is in a dangerous location for the elderly to reach and a large portion of 
the $85,000 grant would go toward architects' fees and Mr. Houde's fee. 
William Craft said that the Finance Committee was unanimously against 
the article, feeling more time is needed to explore various possibilites. John 
Conley opposed the article, stating that many old houses were lost to the 
Town forever through carelessness. This house was built in 1820 and sold 
to John Heard in 1854. Robert Weatherall urged defeat of the article. The 
question was moved, seconded and so voted. The motion was defeated 
1 14-252 on a hand count. 

Article 42: To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of 
monies for the purpose of conducting a fair cash revaluation of all proper- 
ties in the Town; to determine whether said monies shall be raised by borrow- 
ing or otherwise; or to take any other action relative thereto. 

Article 42: Mr. Pechilis moved that the Town vote to raise and appropriate 
the sum of $85,000 for the purpose of conducting a fair cash revaluation of 
all properties in the Town of Ipswich, and obtaining related materiel and 
services therefor. Seconded. Ttfe State requires that all communities be 
assessed at 100% of fair market value; it is unfair to taxpayers not to do so. 
This year the State Tax-Commissioner has revalued Ipswich at $156,800,000 
and cut down the reimbursement on the cherry sheet. Mr. Pechilis felt that 
we are overvalued. We are now assessed at 56% and many appeals to the 
State Appellate Board were made last year; the Town lost in every case. 
Finance Committee was 6-3 in favor of the article, feeling that we can conduct 
a revaluation under our own control and with a company we have chosen 
rather than waiting for the State to order it done and deduct the cost from 
the cherry sheet. Mrs. Weatherall asked that we be independent and wait 
another year, as there is a constitutional amendment coming up in Nov- 
ember on whether to change to a classified evaluation. The amendment 
would allow classification for a tax on open land of 25%, real estate at 40%, 
commercial property at 50% and industrial at 55% of market value. If we 
revalue now, we will be swallowed up by developers who are the only ones 
who could afford it. Robert Marden, who is with the Massachusetts League 
of Cities and Towns, reminded voters that under the law every community is 
forced to a 100% classification. The amendment if it passed will help but 
communities will still have to start on the basis of 100%. David Warner 
felt there were valid arguments but still couldn't see going to 100% evaluation. 
The Town Manager said that whatever way the vote goes in November, the 



39 



intervening time would be spent in analyzing what we have so that we will 
be prepared to begin revaluation. Mr. Emery would rather have the Town 
pay $85,000 and chose its own firm rather than have the State pick the firm. 
On a hand count, the motion passed 224-145. 



And you are directed to serve this Warrant by posting up attested copies 
thereof at the Post Office and at each of the meeting houses in the town, 
and by publication seven days at least prior to the time for holding said 
meeting, in a newspaper published in, or having a general circulation in the 
Town of Ipswich. 

Given unto our hands this Twentieth day of April in the year of the Lord, 
One Thousand Nine Hundred and Seventy Eight. 

BOARD OF SELECTMEN, IPSWICH, MASSACHUSETTS 

Merle R. Pimentel — Chairman 

John M. Pickard 

Adele C. Robertson 

Edwin H. Damon, Jr. 

John A. Pechilis 

On a motion made, seconded and carried on a voice vote, the 1978 Annual 
Town Meeting adjourned at 10:00 p.m. 

ATTEST: 

Isobel N. Coulombe, 
Assistant Clerk 



WARRANT FOR SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 

ESSEX, s.s. 

To the Constable of the Town of Ipswich in said County, 

GREETINGS: 

In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts you are hereby direct- 
ed to notify the Inhabitants of the Town of Ipswich, qualifed to vote in Town 
affairs, to meet at the Ipswich High School in said Ipswich on 

MONDAY, THE TWENTY— FIFTH DAY OF SEPTEMBER, 1978 
at 7:30 o'clock in the evening, then and there to act on the following articles, 
viz: 

Article 1. To see if the Town will vote to transfer a sum of money from the 
Federal Disaster Assistance Administration Account to the Ipswich Electric 
Light Department to reimburse the Light Department for services rendered 
during the February, 1978 storm; or to take any other action relative thereto. 

Article 2. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of 
money to fund supplements to the Police Department budget for salaries 
and fringe benefits for Fiscal 1979, in accordance with the terms of the 
tentative contract with the Ipswich Police Association for Fiscal 1979; or to 
take any other action relative thereto. 



40 



Article 3. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of 
money to fund supplements to the Fire Department Budgets for Fiscal Years 
1978 and 1979 to implement the terms of a tentative contract with Local 
1913, IAFF, for Fiscal Years 1978 and 1979; or to take any other action 
relative thereto. 

Article 4. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate the sum of $85,000 in 
order to make payments for engineering services and other related and 
incidental costs, to prepare construction drawings and specifications for the 
construction of sewerage facilities as outlined in the * 'initial construction 
program' ' of the "Jeffrey's Neck, Great Neck and Little Neck Wastewater 
Facilities Plan;" to determine if said $85,000 shall be raised by borrowing, 
transfer from available funds or otherwise; or to take any other action 
relative thereto. 

Article 5. To see if the Town will vote to amend its By-Laws, Chapter II, 
Section 1 - Annual Town Meeting (a) by deleting the same in its entirety 
and substituting in lieu thereof the following: 

"(a) The Annual Town Meeting of the Town shall be held at 7:30 p.m. 
on the first Monday in April; and all business, except the election of such 
officers and the determination of such matters as by law or by this chapter 
are required to be elected or determined by ballot, shall be considered at 
that meeting or at an adjournment thereof to another day. That part of the 
Annual Town Meeting devoted to the election of officers and the determin- 
aton of such questions as by law or by this chapter are required to be elected 
or determined by ballot shall be held on the second Monday in April in 
accordance with the provisions of Section 6." 

And you are directed to serve this Warrant by posting up attested copies 
thereof, one at the Post Office, one at the Town House, and one at each 
of the meeting houses and by publication, seven days at least prior to the 
time for holding said meeting, in a newspaper published in, or having a 
general circulation in the Town of Ipswich. 

Given unto our hands this Eleventh day of September in the year of our 
Lord, One Thousand Nine Hundred and Seventy Eight. 

BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

Edwin H. Damon, Jr. Chairman 

John M. Pickard 

John T. Beagan 

John A. Pechilis 

Arthur S. LeClair 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 
IPSWICH HIGH SCHOOL SEPTEMBER 25, 1978 



At 7:30 p.m. Moderator Harold Shively announced that there was not a 
quorum present and that 328 voters were needed to make the quorum. It 
was moved, seconded and voted to postpone the meeting to 7:45 p.m. 

At 7:45 there were only 193 voters present and so it was moved, seconded 
and voted to adjourn the meeting until Monday, October 16, 1978 at 7:30 p.m. 



41 



IPSWICH HIGH SCHOOL OCTOBER 16, 1978 

A quorum not being present at 7:30 p.m. it was moved, seconded and 
voted to postpone the meeting until 7:45 p.m. At 7:45 p.m. the meeting was 
about 100 less than the needed 328 and it was voted to postpone the meeting 
until 8:00, as people were coming in but were having parking problems. 
At 7:55 p.m. Moderator Shively announced that there was a quorum present 
and called the meeting to order. The final count was 356. 

Moderator led the Pledge of Allegiance to the flag and certified that the 
Warrant had been properly posted. He appointed the following as tellers: 
John Stella, Rainer Broekel, Sheila Byer, Philip Rhodes. 

Article 1. Selectman Arthur LeClair moved that the Town vote to transfer 
the sum of $8,451 from the Federal Disaster Assistance Administration 
Account within the General Fund to the Ipswich Electric Light Department 
to reimburse the Light Department for services rendered during the February 
1978 storm. Seconded. Mr. LeClair explained that the department worked 
long hours during the storm repairing and replacing downed lines and outages. 
The money has been received from the Federal Government and placed in the 
General Fund. This amount will reimburse the Electric Department for the 
funds expended during the storm. The Finance Committee recommended, 
with Chairman Pszenny stating that this would have no effect on the tax rate, 
as it was merely a transfer. The motion carried on a unanimous voice vote. 

Article 2. Selectman John Beagan moved that the Town raise and appropriate 
the sum of $23,372 to fund the supplements to the Police Department budget 
for salaries and fringe benefits for Fiscal Year 1979, in accordance with the 
terms of a contract with the Ipswich Police Association for Fiscal Year 1979. 
Seconded. This provides a 6% increase for the Police; the Town Manager 
had made a survey of area towns of comparable size and this will bring the 
Ipswich force to a level with them. The Finance Committee approved, though 
Mrs. Conley said that the Committee was not happy with the limitations of 
binding arbitration. The only new benefit was the provision for EMT cer- 
tification; after discussion the Committee felt it was definitely in the Town's 
interest, as very often the Police are the first ones on the scene. The motion 
carried on a unanimous voice vote. 

Article 3. Chairman of Selectmen Edwin Damon Jr. moved that the Town 
vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $28,900 to fund supplements to the 
Fire Department budgets for Fiscal Years 1978 and 1979 to implement the 
terms of a contract with the Local 1913, IAFF, for Fiscal Years 1978 and 
1979, in accordance with the following schedule: 





Fiscal 1978 


Fiscal 1979 


Wages 


$11,353 


$ 9,804 


Overtime 


996 


3,400 


Fringe Expenses & 






Holiday Adjustments 


500 


500 


Other Expenses 




2,347 



$12,849 $16,051 $28,900 



42 



Seconded. The salary increase for fiscal 1978 amounts to 5%, the same as 
that received by other Town employees; the increase for the present year is 
6%, the same as the Police increase. Beginning April 8, 1979, the work week 
will be reduced to 42 hours. The approval of this contract will bring to a 
close five years of labor disputes between the firefighters and the Tou n. The 
Finance Committee approved 6-2, with Edward Nagus stating that bargaining 
over the years had been time-consuming and frustrating but the past year 
has seen a more reasonable attitude; the new Manager has established a 
uniform salary schedule and job descriptions, and there is a new spirit of 
communication. The motion carried on a unanimous voice vote. 

Article 4. Selectman John Pickard moved for indefinite postponement. 
Seconded. Mr. Pickard said that the Town is not prepared to underwrite a 
project of this magnitude, especially in view of the unreliability of State and 
Federal aid. William Craft said that the Finance Committee agreed and 
recommended the postponement; the issue of sewerage on the Necks continues 
to be serious and the Committee hopes that this matter will not be completely 
dropped. Harold Balch, saying he favored sewering the area, wondered why 
Mr. Craft is now opposed to it when he is moving away from Great Neck. 
Moderator Shively refused to let Mr. Craft reply, and told Mr. Balch that 
Mr. Craft was presenting the recommendation of the Finance Committee 
of which he is a member. The motion carried on a voice vote. 

Article 5. Selectman John Pechilis moved that the Town vote to amend its 
By-laws, Chapter II, Section 1 "Annual Town Meeting" Subsection (a) by 
deleting the same in its entirety and substituting in lieu thereof the following 
"(a) The Annual Town Meeting of the Town shall be held at 7:30 p.m. on 
the first Monday in April; and all business, except the election of such officers 
and the determination of such matters as by law or by this chapter are re- 
quired to be elected or determined by ballot, shall be considered at that 
meeting or at an adjournment thereof to another day. That part of the Annual 
Town Meeting devoted to the election of officers and the determination of 
such questions as by law or by this chapter are required to be elected or de- 
termined by ballot shall be held on the second Monday in April in accordance 
with the provisions of Section 6." Seconded. It has been found that atten- 
dance at Annual Town Meetings has been declining since it was moved from 
March to May, and the Government Study Committee was asked to make a 
study; it is its recommendation that the meeting be moved back to April. The 
Finance Committee unanimously recommended. It felt that as many people 
as possible should be encouraged to attend the meetings. Only the Finance 
Committee and Board of Selectmen would be directly affected, having a 
month less to work on the warrant and budget. Boley Radzinski, Chairman 
of the Government Study Committee, spoke on the article and said that the 
Town Manager felt there would be no problem. William Wasserman question- 
ed a possible conflict with the presidential primary; nobody could remember 
if it was still held in April but felt that since it occurred only once every four 
years it would not be a problem. The motion carried on a voice vote. 

There being no further business, it was moved seconded and voted to 
adjourn the Special Town Meeting at 8:20 p.m. 

ATTEST: 

Harold G. Comeau, 
Town Clerk 



43 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

Edwin H. Damon, Jr., Chairman 

During the past year the Board of Selectmen has placed major emphasis 
on three areas of vital concern. They are (1) the cost of government or taxes, 
(2) water supply and (3) suitable and cost effective refuse disposal. 

The Selectmen have made policy decisions in each of these areas. 

The Board directed the Town Manager to prepare a budget showing no 
increase over last year while at the same time indicating priorities. The 
Manager has done this and the Board of Selectmen and Finance Committee 
have further reduced the budget. As a result, we anticipate that the tax rate 
will remain stable or, at most, increase minimally. 

Water has been the major concern for the past several years, and we have 
had to buy it from Hamilton when our supply has been low. Now, for the 
first time in recent years, we do not anticipate the need to purchase water. 
This is because a new town well system off Essex Road is nearly completed 
and will be on line in late spring or early summer. 

The wellfield is rated by the state as capable of producing more than one- 
half million gallons per day and will make water bans a thing of the past. 
Additionally, it will reduce our reliance on the Winthrop Wells which should 
mean better quality for all town water users. 

The Board is working toward development of additional supply and will 
ask the annual town meeting to appropriate approximately $20,000 to conduct 
prolonged pump testing of a promising well-site off Fellow's Road. This is 
the same procedure followed in the preliminary stages of developing the 
Essex Road wellfield about to come on line. 

Refuse disposal is an extremely complex problem which has not yet been 
resolved. Since the state closed our dump last October, the Board and the 
Town Manager have devoted an untold number of hours to finding a sqlu- 
tion that satisfied the needs of the town and the requirements of the State 
at a price the taxpayers can afford. 

We have opened and are operating with state approval a recycling and 
solid waste transfer station on the site of the former dump. Material left 
there, along with residential rubbish picked up at curbside by our contractor, 
is hauled on a daily basis to Saugus where it is disposed of by RESCO, a 
private incinerating firm. But this is an expensive proposition, so the Board 
is seeking a less costly method of rubbish disposal. 

As this is written, the Selectmen are reviewing an exhaustive report by 
the Town Manager on alternatives. While a decision may or may not have 
been made on the most viable option open to the Town, we do anticipate 
being considerably closer, by the annual town meeting, to resolving this per- 
plexing and most important question. 



44 



TOWN MANAGER 

George E. Howe 

This past year Town government has commenced improvements to our 
water supply and distribution system, most notably the new Essex Well and 
Winthrop Wells upgrading. We have experienced the closure of our sanitary 
landfill and the attendant problems of adjusting to limits on curbside collec- 
tion and developing a transfer station. Moreover, we have been paying the 
cost of delayed decisions in labor negotiations and maintenance of our 
physical plant. 

Perhaps most significantly, in the past year we have come to realize that 
we cannot depend, on a long-term predictable basis, upon increases in State 
and Federal aid to help offset inflation in labor, energy, and materials costs. 
In light of the long-term prospect of inflation-depleted State and Federal 
aid, we must attempt to place as many services as possible on a "pay as you 
use" basis, as has been the case this past year for revised sewer and water 
rates, health, shellfish and cemetery fees. 

As we look ahead to Fiscal Year 1980 as one of austerity, we must carefully 
define our priorities and thoughtfully distinguish between those town services 
which we deem are essential and those which we can forego. A level tax rate 
in Fiscal Year 1981 will require extraordinary restraint on Town spending. 

In the long run, however, given the current fiscal structure in Massachu- 
setts, Ipswich must give serious consideration to broadening the tax base to 
help stabilize the burden on its homeowners and businesses. 

I wish to thank the Town Departments, Boards and Committees for the 
assistance they have given me, and to thank the Board of Selectmen for their 
direction and support. 



ASSESSORS OFFICE 

Bruce A. Symmes, Chief Assessor 

With an increase of just over $750,000 in valuation and spending increased 
by over $730,000, the tax rate in Ipswich this year took a big jump from 
$71 .00 to the present $80.00 per thousand. Every $75,000 that is spent or cut 
from the total amount that we must raise will affect the tax rate $1.00 per 
thousand. 

We have signed a contract for, and will be going through, a revaluation 
program so that we may bring all of our properties in line and everyone will 
be paying their fair share. In order for this to be accomplished, we are going 
to need the cooperation of all of the townspeople. 



45 



BUILDING DEPARTMENT 

Ralph Hebert, Inspector 



1978 1977 

Construction Valuation $1,452,751.00 $1,817,916.00 

Fees Collected: 

Building Permits 2,509.00 2,994.00 

Occupancy Permits 120.00 195.00 

Certificate of Inspection 1,100.00 755.00 

Total Fees Collected: $3,729.00 $3,944.00 

Building Permits Issued 213 248 

New Construction, Miscellaneous construction, additions, remodelings, 
demolition, sign, stoves, pools, and siding. 



CEMETERY DEPARTMENT 

Walter H. Hulbert, Jr., Superintendent 

There were 109 interments in 1978 compared to 86 in 1977, with a three 
year average of 96. 

Four singles, five doubles, five four-and two eight-grave lots were sold 
with perpetual care. Nine doubles and six four-grave lots were awarded to 
Veterans by the American Legion, with no revenue for care of these lots. 

Fifty-eight monument and marker foundations were laid and twenty-three 
sets of lot bounds were set. Eleven Veteran government markers were set. 

General groundskeeping was conducted in all cemeteris; including raising 
and repairing all winter and settled graves in the older cemeteries. 

Two hundred eleven tons of finish coat of hot top was used to reservice 
avenues in Highland Cemetery. 

Forty-one monuments were reset that were toppled by vandals plus other 
grounds damage. 

All Cemetery records were microfilmed to date to protect us in case of 
loss. 

The following equipment replacements were purchased: Chapel Tent 
canopy, one Stanley trimmer, four, five h.p. Briggs and Stratton engine 
for 21" rotary push type mowers, one, five h.p. Briggs and Stratton engine 
for air rake and one, sixteen h.p. Wheel Horse tractor with rotary mower 
(this unit was purchased with the trade-in of the old unit). 

All equipment was kept properly serviced. 



46 



FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 



TOWN OF IPSWICH 
MASSACHUSETTS 



Fiscal Year Ending June 30, 1978 



TOWN OF IPSWICH 
MASSACHUSETTS 

BALANCE SHEET - JUNE 30, 1978 



ASSETS 



Cash 
General 

Petty: 
Accounting 
Schools 
Library 
Electric 

Investments 
Revenue 
Non Revenue 



Accounts Receivable 
Taxes : 
Real Estate 
Levy of 1972 

1973/1974 
1974/1975 
1975/1976 
1976/1977 
1977/1978 



Personal Property 
Levy 1967 
1969 
1970 
1971 
1972 

1973/1974 
1974/1975 
1975/1976 
1976/1977 
1977/1978 

Excise 
Motor Vehicle: 
Levy of 1964 
1965 
1966 
1967 
1968 
1969 
1970 
1971 
1972 
1973 
1974 
1975 
1976 
1977 
1978 









LIABILITIES AND RESERVES 












Temporary Loans : 










$ 321 


,061 


.97 


In Anticipation of Fed Grant 
State and County Assessments 
State: 


$ 


581 


.576, 


.00 




5. 


,00 


Special Education 




14 


,604, 


,00 




260, 


.00 


Mosquito Control 






292, 


,00 




60. 


.00 


Ipswich River Watershed 






20, 


,97 




275. 


.00 


County: 










321 


,661. 


V 


Tax 




3 

4, 


,581, 
,042, 


,00 

,43 


1,000. 


,000. 


.00 






22, 


,540. 


,40 


150 


,000. 


00 


Employees Payroll Deductions 
















Group Health Insurance 
Group Life Insurance 




30 


,102, 
167, 


,58 


1,150 : 


,000. 


00 


,12 








Tax Sheltered Annuities 




8, 


,342, 


,46 



Guarantee Deposits 



102,379.10 



1,560.38 

2,801.31 

290.41 

1,333.02 

382.49 

171.94 

1,089.72 

1,237.88 

6,775.87 

16,120.07 

26,243.72 

39,546.28 

46,174.07 

70,329.53 

81,614.77 

295,671.46 



State Grants: 
Shellfish 

Elderly Affairs 

Appropriation Balances 
Revenue : 
General 

Municipal Light : 
Depreciation 
Construction 
Water 
Maintenance and Operation 
Plant and Investment 



38,612.16 



66.08 


Municipal Light : 










1,149.12 


Meter 






12 


,138.00 


5,197.92 


Meter Income 






8 


,925.15 


12,781.99 


Contract Performance 




2 


,737.74 


43,878.25 








23 


,800.89 


258,907.27 


Agency : 










321,980.63 


County Dog Licenses 






15.00 




Motor Vehicle Excise 


Other Town 




16.50 




Sewer Apptd To Be 


Refund 




125.48 


56.25 


Tailings 








156.98 


48.00 


Unclaimed Checks 






8 ; 


,429.49 


278.60 












310.80 


Investment Fund 










358.40 


Conservation 






22 : 


,672.99 


818.13 


Trust Fund 










1,563.65 


Library Addition 






2, 


,896.10 


21,204.53 












37,190.00 


Federal Grants : 










40,550.74 


School: 











PL 94482 3,094.00 

PL 93380 25,525.57 

Housing And Urban Development 194.92 

FDAA 3,937.00 



32,751.49 



2,952.85 
240.91 



3,193.76 



8,631,129.50 

157,912.45 
6,005.85 

275,116.78 
42,504.57 



TOWN OF IPSWICH 
MASSACHUSETTS 

BALANCE SHEET - JUNE 30, 1978 



ASSETS 
Farm Animal: 
Levy of 1973 
1974 
1975 
1976 
1978 

Special Taxes: 

In Litigation: 

Levy of 1970 

1971 

1972 

1973 

1974 
1975 
1976 
1977 

Tax Title & Possessions 
Tax Title 
Tax Possession 

Special Assessments: 
Sewer : 
Added To Taxes: 
Levy of 1973 
1975 
1976 
1977 
1978 
1979 

Committed Interest 
Levy of 1973 
1975 
1976 
1977 
1978 
1979 

Departmental 
Health 
Cemetery 
Veterans 

Highway Machinery 
Education 

Electric - Rates 
Water 
Added to Taxes 
Levy 1971 
1972 



LIABILITIES AND RESERVES 





Non-Revenue 


20.00 


Water 


20.00 


Construction 


32.50 




203.50 




153.00 





41,012.68 



9,153,681.83 



429.00 



287.66 
287.25 
286.84 
215.10 

201.29 
618.34 



Loans Authorized And Unissued 915,700.00 
Sale of Cemetery Lots Fund 15,034.95 



Receipts Reserves For Appro 
Sewer 
Cemetery 
State Grants 
Water Pollution 
County Dog Fund 



17,307.85 
454.33 

3,270.00 
1,218.20 



730.59 




22,250.38 


752.78 


Overlay Surplus 


27,657.30 


3,379.85 


Overlays Reserved for Abatements 




58,319.16 


Levy of 1967 


56.25 


6,725.28 


1969 


48.00 


65,044.44 


1970 


278.60 




1971 


310.80 




1972 


421.12 




1973/1974 


2,464.39 


23.40 


1975/1976 


22,487.31 


23.40 


1976/1977 


22,989.89 


180.90 


1977/1978 


65,116.72 


171.35 




114,173.08 


820.97 


Excess Sale of Land Low Value 


717.32 


14,161.67 






15,381.69 


Revenue Reserved Until Collected: 




23.87 


Motor Vehicle Excise 


295,671.46 


7.89 


Farm Animal Excise 


429.00 


266.05 


Special Accessment 


24,596.49 


68.46 


Special Taxes 


3,379.85 


551.17 


Tax Titles and Possessions 


65,044.44 


8,422.85 


Departmental 


58,936.57 


9,340.29 


Municipal Light 


255,148.38 




Water 


62,927.07 


172.14 


Sewer 


31,836.30 


240.50 




797,969.56 


55,875.11 


Reserve for Petty Cash Advances 


600.00 


690.62 






1,958.20 


Surplus Revenue 




58,936.57 


Genera; 


446,042.81 


255,148.38 


Municipal Light 


120,040.37 




Water 


11,246.56 



162.63 
215.97 



Insurance Receipt 



577,329.74 
3,579.56 



TOWN OF IPSWICH 
MASSACHUSETTS 

BALANCE SHEET - JUNE 30, 1978 



ASSETS 



1973 

1974/1975 
1975/1976 
1976/1977 
1977/1978 
1978/1979 
Rates 

Sewer : 

Added To Taxes 
Levy 1971 
1972 
1973 

1975/1976 
1976/1977 
1977/1978 
1978/1979 

Rates 



86.55 

44.25 

662.50 

1,130.30 

6,036.69 

22,422.91 

32,165.27 



62,927.07 



23.52 

20.35 

19.29 

82.19 

160.02 

869.83 

3,682.37 

26,978.73 



31,836.30 
581,576.00 
1,089,614.59 



Federally Aided P.W. 

Revenue 1978/1979 

Loans Authorized 

Water 5/3/76 ART 28,000.00 

Sanitary Landfill 5/2/77 ART 95,000.00 

Annex Renovation 5/2/77 ART 95,000.00 

Well Site Acquisition 5/2/77 ART 75,000.00 

Annex Renovation 5/2/78 ART 95,000.00 

Essex Road Well 5/2/78 ART 184,200.00 

School Repairs 5/2/78 ART 148,000.00 

Town Hall Renovation 5/2/78 ART 56,000.00 

Wood's Lane Sewer 5/2/78 ART 139,500.00 



Overdrawn or Unprovided for: 
Perpetual Care Bequest 
Library Trust Fund 
Stabilization 
Federal Grant Title I 
H.U.D. Community Development 
Aid to Libraries 
Snow Removal 

Underestimates 
State Recreation Areas 
Metro Air Pollution 

Overlay Deficit 
Levy 1974/1975 
Court Judgment 



915,700.00 

4,891.45 

21.41 

18,400.00 

3,695.95 

67.17 

820.37 

78,341.87 

106,238.22 

1,540.92 

33.10 

1,574.02 

1,729.21 

1,500.00 

$12,392,048.79 



LIABILITIES AND RESERVES 

Revolving 
School Cafeteria 
School Athletics 
'•< ]l '' t Education 
Historical Preservation 
Police-Special Duty 



15,955.54 

3,459.25 

5,352.50 

1,733.52 

724.00 



26,724.81 



$12,392,048.79 



TOWN OF IPSWICH 
MASSACHUSETTS 

BALANCE SHEET - JUNE 30, 1978 



DEBT ACCOUNTS 



ASSETS 
Net Funded or Fixed Debt 
Inside 
Outside 
Public Service 



$ 1,066,000.00 
200,000.00 
585,000.00 



LIABILITIES AND RESERVES 
Serial Loans 
Inside Debt Limit 
General 
Sewer $635,000.00 

School 770,000.00 

Sanitary Landfill 75,000.00 



Rust Garage 

Outside Debt Limit 
General 

Sewer 
Public Service 

Electric 

Water 



86,000.00 



235,000.00 
350,000.00 



$ 1,851,000.00 



1,066,000.00 



200,000.00 



585,000.00 
$1,851,000.00 



TRUST AND INVESTMENT FUNDS 



Cash & Securities 
In Custody of Treasurer 

In Custody of Trustees 



In Custody of Treasurer: 
Animal Fund 

Mrs. William G. Brown 
Cemetery Funds 

Perpetual Care 

Flower Fund 
Investment Funds 

Stabilization 
Library Funds 

John C. Kimball 
Park Funds 

Appleton Memorial - Fountain 

Martha I. Savory - Tree 

Dow Boulder 
School Funds 

R.T. Crane - Picnic 

Eunice C. Cowles 

Mark Newman 

Marianna T. Jones 
Library Funds 

Heard 

Elizabeth Lathrop 

Memorial Book 

Abbie Newman 

George Spiller 

Treadwell 

Wales Endowment 

Trust Account 
In Custody of Trustees 
School Funds 

Burley 

Brown 

Manning 

Feoffees of Grammar Schools 



TOWN OF IPSWICH 
MASSACHUSETTS 

BALANCE SHEET - JUNE 30, 1978 



FEDERAL REVENUE SHARING ACCOUNTS 



ASSETS 
Cash 
Certificate of Deposit 



2,331.88 
300,000.00 
302,331.88 



LIABILITIES AND RESERVES 
Federal Grant $ 

Appropriation Balance 



8,064.88 
294,267.00 



$ 302,331.88 



FEDERAL ANTI RECESSION - PUBLIC EMPLOYMENT 



Cash 



70,306.20 Federal Grant 
Appropriation Balance 



$ 70,306.20 



28.00 
70,278.20 



70,306.20 



DEFERRED REVENUE ACCOUNTS 



Appor Sewer Assess Not Due 



Suspended Sewer Assess Not Due 



$ 


124,701 


80 


Appor 


Sewer Revenue 


Due 










1979 










13,173.94 




4,430 


88 


1980 
1981 
1982 
1983 
1984 
1985 
1986 
1987 
1988 
1989 
1990 
1991 
1992 
1993 
1994 
1995 
1996 
1997 










11,958.73 

11,406.94 

11,187.92 

9,808.26 

8,529.43 

8,031.04 

8,031.04 

7,636.04 

7,066.06 

6,449.21 

5,096.16 

4,968.72 

4,366.20 

3,158.20 

1,168.16 

913.37 

876.29 

876.09 

124,701.80 








Suspended 


Sewer 


Revenue 


4,430.88 


$ 


129,132. 


68 


$ 129,136.28 



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TOWN OF IPSWICH 
MASSACHUSETTS 

DETAILED STATEMENT OF CASH RECEIPTS 
FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 197? 



GENERAL 


REVENUE 


Taxes 






Local 






Real Estate 


Levy 


of 


1974 


Levy 


of 


1975 


Levy 


of 


1976 


Levy 


of 


1977 


Levy 


of 


1978 


Personal 


Property 


Levy 


of 


1976 
1977 
1978 



Tax Title Redemptions 

Farm Animal 

In Lieu of Taxes 
Veterans Abatements 
State Owned Property 
Housing Authority 
Crane's Beach 
Blind Abatements 
Abatements Ch59 S5317 

State Local Aid Fund 
Chapter 70 

Special Needs 
Lottery 



Licenses and Permits 
Alcoholic Beverages 
Shellfish 
Tax Licenses 
Common Victuallers 
Dealers License 
Inspection Permits 
Occupancy Permits 
Building Permits 
Septic Tank Permits 
Plumbing Permits 
License to Sell Firearms 
License to Carry Firearms 
Marriage Licenses 
Clam Permits 
Street Opening Permits 
Gas Permits 
Miscellaneous 



177.35 

2,876.24 

51,309.78 

178,823.85 

4,790,745.09 

5,023,932.31 

13.20 

10,478.15 

103,818.60 

114,309.95 

19,542.82 

19,542.83 

420.97 

420.97 

5,583.97 

97,366.70 

864.00 

15,050.28 

175.00 

3,412.50 

122,452.45 

333,405.82 
23,661.23 

481.493.08 
97,915.68 

936,475.81 



16,216.00 

925.00 

30.00 

212.00 

260.00 

1,025.00 
175.00 

2,741.00 
670.00 

1,282.00 
40.00 

1,170.00 
424.00 

3,360.00 
175.00 
839.00 

2,072.00 



$ 6,217,134.32 



31,616.00 



TOWN OF IPSWICH 
MASSACHUSETTS 

DETAILED STATEMENT OF CASH RECEIPTS 
FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 1978 



Fines and Forfeits 
Court Fines (District) 6,569.00 

Forfeit 155.00 

20.00 
30.00 
Restitution 79.80 



Specification Forfeit 



Grants and Gifts 
Federal Revenue Sharing 

Entitlements 266,112.00 
Public Works Employment 
Entitlement 

Title I - EDA 35,252.00 
Title II-AntirecessionFiscalAssi st 40 , 029 . 00 

341,393.00 
Federal Grants 
School 

Title VIB 13,560.00 

IV 59,950.15 
Other Purposes 

Community Planning 132,377.26 

Library 770.24 

Forestry & Wildlife Project 11,060.00 

Shellfish Conservation 11,790.00 

Federal Disaster Assistance 35,313.00 
Offsets to Outlay 

Sewer Construction 1,679.00 

State Grants 

Career Incentive 9,591.87 

Highways 61,023.14 

Highways and Transit Dev 61,011.68 

School Transportation 111,038.00 

Vocational Education 35.00 

Transportation Reimbursement 1,451.40 

Environmental Affairs 42,000.00 

Water Pollution Control EPA 106,724.00 

Library Extension 4,331.63 

Water Pollution Control 3,270.00 

Food Service 88,817.13 

Special Education 2,880.00 

Marine Fisheries 7,790.35 

County Grants 

Dog Fund 1,557.61 
Other Grants 

Feoffees 7,500.00 



All Other General Revenue 

Sale Tax Possessions 1,132.27 

Health Insurance Reimb 167.21 

Tax Title Interest & Cost 3,103.76 

Bicentennial 96.00 



6,853.80 



607,892.65 



499,964.2 



9,057.6 
1,116,914.4 



4,499.2- 



TOWN OF IPSWICH 
MASSACHUSETTS 

DETAILED STATEMENT OF CASH RECEIPTS 
FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 1978 



Commercial Revenue 
Spec ial A ssessments 

Sewer 
Privileges 

Motor Vehicle Excise 
Departmental 
General Government: 
Selectmen 

I.D. Cards 
Accountant 

Insurance Reimbursement 
Treasurer Collector 
Costs - Taxes 
Costs - Motor Vehicles 
Tax Certificates 
Town Clerk 
Certified Copies 
Recordings 
All Others 
Appeals Board 

Hearings 
Planning Board 



66.00 

16,054.00 

759.00 

676.00 

1,982.00 

1,287.53 
767.50 
479.70 

452.00 



32,730.08 
449,429.26 



Hearings 




31.50 








Historical 




405.65 








Conservation 












Miscellaneous 




150.00 














23, 


,110. 


88 


Public Safety: 












Police 












Photo Copies 


1. 


,099.00 








Special Duty 


34, 


,574.00 








Bicycle Registration 




33.00 








Firearms Identification 




190.00 








Miscellaneous 




238.75 








Sealer of Weights and Measures 




72.00 








Dog Officer 




446.00 














36 , 


,652. 


,75 


Health Sanitation: 












Sewer Rentals 


31 


,268.78 








Recycling 


3 


,163.96 








Sewer Connection Fees 




910.00 














35 , 


,342. 


74 


Highways : 












Chapter 90 






52 . 


,873. 


,06 


Public Assistance: 












Budgetary 






9, 


,678. 


,33 


Veterans Services: 












Reimbursement for Relief 


47 


,920.94 








Recovery 




134.00 














48 


,054, 


,94 


Schools : 












Tuition of State Wards 


8 


,433.00 








Tuition from Individuals 


5 


,392.50 









TOWN OF IPSWICH 
MASSACHUSETTS 

DETAILED STATEMENT OF CASH RECEIPTS 
FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 1978 



Tuition from Municipalities 
Tuition from Welfare 


5,573.80 
10,518.00 








Sale of Lunches 


120,565.69 








Athletic Account 


10,491.04 








Telephone Commission 
Reimbursement 


177.35 
288.96 


161 


,440, 


.34 


Libraries : 










Photo Copies 
Fines 


1,192.75 
1,413.61 








Lost Books 


236.74 


2 


,843, 


.10 


Recreation: 










Beach Stickers 


2,454.05 








Swim Program 


641.00 








Dance Proceeds 


1,337.00 


4 


,432, 


,05 


Unclassified: 










Rental Town Property 
Demolition 


4,435.54 
5.00 








Sale of Town Property 
Chamber of Commerce 


51.00 
700.00 








Telephone Commission 


4.73 


5. 


,196, 


,27 


Public Service Enterprises 










Electricity 
Sale of Electricity 


2,779,789.20 








Aid in Construction 


4,499.44 








Water 
Sale of Water 


240,932.03 








Liens 
Levy of 1975 
1976 


146.95 
192.20 








1977 
1978 
1979 


1,779.35 

11,073.97 

145.88 


3,038 : 


,559. 


02 


Cemeteries 
Sale of Lots and Graves 


1,750.00 








Openings and Interments 

Liners 

Tents 


6,435.00 

.00 

435.00 








Foundations 


924.50 








Care of Lots and Graves 


278.00 


9, 


,822. 


50 


Interest 
Electric Meter Deposits 
Taxes and Assessments 


679.10 
29,810.66 








Motor Vehicle Excise 
Investment Funds 


461.13 
81,004.13 








Public Trust Funds 
School 
Library 


260.45 
2,457.39 









TOWN OF IPSWICH 
MASSACHUSETTS 

DETAILED STATEMENT OF CASH RECEIPTS 
FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 1974 



Cemetery 

Federal Revenue Sharing 
Other 
Electric Depreciation 

Municipal Indebtedness 
Serial Loans 
Essex Road Wells 
School Repairs 
Rust Garage 
Essex Road Well 

Agency Trust and Investment 
Agency 

Dog Licenses for County 

Electric Meter Deposit 

Tailings 

Payroll Deductions 
Group Insurance 
Annuities 
Clothing 
Trust 

Perpetual Care Funds 

Stabilization 

Library Reimb for Exp 

Eunice C. Cowles Scholarship 

R.T. Crane Picnis 

Library Building 
Investment 

Revenue 

Non Revenue 

Revenue Sharing 

Refunds 
General Departments 

General Government 

Public Safety 

Health and Sanitation 

Highways 

Veterans 

Schools 

Libraries 

Recreation 

Unclassified 
Public Service Enterprises 

Electricity 
All Other 
Federal Revenue Sharing 

TOTAL RECEIPTS 



13,122.20 

16,214.26 

3,349.83 

1,058.12 



120,000.00 

150,000.00 

86,000.00 

60,000.00 



2,954.25 

14,165.00 

612.72 

177,769.27 

31,925.48 

1,467.43 

134,213.40 

257,220.59 

8,000.00 

50.00 

1,183.40 

1,000.31 

5,247,229.19 

384,496.45 

1,825,000.00 



151,210.47 

2,102.99 

271.31 

322.73 

1,183.25 

710.06 

7.35 

519.48 

696.75 

5,641.39 

103,611.80 

13.75 



148,417.27 



416,000.00 



8,087,287.49 



266,291.33 
$20,205,179.23 



TOWN OF IPSWICH 
MASSACHUSETTS 

DETAILED STATEMENT OF PAYMENTS 
FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 1 97? 



Departmental 
General Government $ 493,327.95 

Public Safety 880,977.08 

Health and Sanitation 294,663.60 

Highways 560,549.30 

Veterans Services 95,111.98 
Schools 4,746,304.94 

Libraries 106,414.23 

Parks and Recreation 123,019.67 

Pensions and Retirement 308,355.89 

Unclassified 313,191.14 

Departmental-Revenue Sharing 

Fire Vehicle 25,000.00 

Sanitation Contract 68,750.00 

Group Insurance 130,000.00 

Other Insurance 31 ,418.00 



$ 7,921,915.78 



255,168.00 
Departmental-Federal AntiRecession 

Town Hall Renovation 13,443.80 

Public Service Enterprises 

Electric 
Operation and Maintenance 2,531,749.49 
Construction 1,105.61 

Depreciation Fund 126,889.30 

Water 
Operation and Maintenance 203,536.03 

Construction 104,407.18 

Plant and Investment 15,831.35 

Sewer 
Operation and Maintenance 130,581.52 

Outlay 6,619.42 



Cemeteries 
Cemetery 
Operation and Maintenance 69,991.51 

Outlay 9,165.00 

Interest 



On Loans 59,915.00 

Other Interest 28,248.97 

Municipal Indebtedness 

Temporary Loans 106,724.00 

Other Loans 

General 255,000.00 

Public Service Enterprises 101,000.00 

Warrants or Previous Orders 1 18,314. 30 

State & County Assessments 

Audit of Municipal Accounts 5,010.94 

State Parks 42,310.13 

Motor Vehicle Excise Bills 1,280.40 



3,120,719.90 



79,156.51 



, 163.97 



581,038.30 



TOWN OF IPSWICH 
MASSACHUSETTS 

DETAILED STATEMENT OF PAYMENTS 
FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 1978 



Metropolitan Air Pollution Control 




725.55 




Metropolitan Area Planning 


1 


,651.79 




Shellfish Purification Plants 


1 


,010.84 




Mass Bay Transportation Authority 


37 


,856.48 




Mosquito Control 


26 


,362.00 




Ipswich River Water Shed 




4.23 




County Tax 


229 


,810.79 


346,023.15 


Agency Trust And Investment 








Agency 








Veterans District 


17 


,884. (.0 




Dog Licenses for County 


2 


,984.25 




Deposits for Services 




500.00 




Payroll Deductions 








Group Insurance 


178 


,438.48 




Annuities 


31 


,313.25 




Uniforms 


1 


,455.98 




Workmens Compensation Advance 




779.00 




Trust 








Cemetery 








Principal Transfer 


136 


,235.25 




Perpetual Care Bequest 


3 


,440.01 




Perpetual Care Income 




144.68 




Flore Fund Bequest 




200.00 




Flower Fund Income 




124.91 




Conservation Fund 


1 


,985.80 




Other Public Trust Funds 








Income : 








Mrs. William G. Brown 




27.63 




John C. Kimball 




10.71 




Marianna T. Jones 




62.16 




Richard T. Crane 


1 


,597.28 




Eunice C. Cowles 








Mark Newman 




249.74 




Martha Savory 




28.48 




Dow Boulder 




7.96 




Appleton Memorial 




44.32 




Library Trust 


2 


,343.99 




Library Building 




.00 




Expenses : 








R.T. Craine Picnic 


2 


,565.40 




Eunice C. Cowles Scholarship 




50.00 




William G. Brown-Dog Pound 




200.00 




Investment 








Certificate of Deposit 








Federal Revenue Sharing 


1,900 


,000.00 




Revenue 


4,644 


,496.45 




Non Revenue 


450 


,000.00 




Stabilization 


275 


,226.03 


7,652,395.76 


Refunds 









Taxes 
Personal Property 41,769.07 



TOWN OF IPSWICH 
MASSACHUSETTS 

DETAILED STATEMENT OF PAYMENTS 
FOR THE YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 1978 



Real Estate (Local) 

Real Estate (Other) 
Licenses and Permits 
Special Assessments 
Motor Vehicle Excise (Local) 
Motor Vehicle Excise (Other) 
General Departments 

General Government 

Health and Sanitation 
Public Service Enterprises 

Electricity 

Water 

Electric Meter 

Electric Meter Income 
Accrued Interest 

TOTAL PAYMENTS 



19,743.47 

31.20 

470.00 

114.12 

19,920.97 
135.23 

644.63 
47.40 

172.38 
1,082.90 
9,487.00 

482.53 
3,447.37 



97,548.27 



$20,155,573.44 



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BURLEY EDUCATION FUND 



BALANCE ON HAND JANUARY 1 -, n?fl: 



sn^BO-^? 



INCOI1E FROM FUNDS FOR YEAR n?fl AS FOLLOWS : 

Interest-Ipswich Savings Bank $53.51 

Interest-Ipswich Savings Bank {Caldwell Fund} 2T3.S5 

Interest-Ipswich Co-operative Bank 5fci-lfci 

Interest-Ipswich Co-operative Bank-Term Deposit M^b .MM 



BALANCE ON HAND JANUARY 1 -, 117^ AS FOLLOWS: 

Deposited in Ipswich Savings Bank 51-.077.M1 

Deposited in Ipswich Savings Bank -CCaldwell Fund} 5i773-M5 
Ipswich Co-operative Bank-Paid Up Certificate 1-iOOO-QO 
Ipswich Co-operative Bank-Term Deposit bi7fiD.D7 



fl^-lb 



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Total Invested Funds 



SlM-.bSO.^ 



Respectfully Submitted 
BURLEY EDUCATION FUND 



V- James DiFazioi Treasurer 



TRUSTEES OF MANNING SCHOOL FUND 
GEORGE H.W. HAYES, DONALD P. WHISTON, JAMESP.PISTORIO AND 

DAVID C. Y/ILLIAMS, SR. 

MANNING SCHOOL FUNDS 

January 1, 1978 

Balance in Account #14293, Ipswich Savings Bank $ 50,769.53 
Balance in Account # 7884, Ipswich Savings Bank 25,190.30 
Balance in Account # 1995, Ipswich Co-operative B ank27, 673.80 

3103,633.63 
Income from Interest and dividends 6,603.03 

$110,236.66 
LESS DISBURSEMENTS; 

Rental of Safe Deposit Box $ 8.00 
Supplies for Ipswich High School 4767*88 



4,775.88 
$105,460.78 
ASSETS IN FUNDS 
December 31, 1978 

Balance in Account #14293, Ipswich Savings Bank $ 50,769.53 
Balance in Account # 7884, Ipswich Savings Bank 25,190.30 
Balance in Account # 1995, Ipswich Co-op Bank 29,500.95 

$105,460.78 
SECURITIES AT BOOK VALUE 
276 Shares, First National Bank of Boston $2,998.20 
20 Shares, Ipswich Co-operative Bamk 4,000.00 

6,998.20 
$112,458.98 

David C. Williams, Treasurer 



BROWN FUND 

The meeting of the Brown Fund was convened January 12, 1978 at the 
Ipswich Savings Bank meeting room at 2;00 P.M. by Gardiner A. Bolles. 

Howard R. Hill and James C. Lahar were appointed to fill the vacancy 
caused by the death of J. Perry Smith. 

Upon motion of Howard R. Hill, seconded by Gardiner A. Bolles, James 

C. Lahar was elected Treasurer, and upon motion of Howard R. Hill, seconded 

by James C. Lahar, Gardiner A. Bolles was elected clerk. 

Upon motion of Howard R. Hill, seconded by James C. Lahar, it was voted to withdraw 
the balance from the Salem Savings Bank and consolidate the funds with 
the balance in the Ipswich Savings Bank. 

Meeting adjourned at 3:00 P.M. 

Gardiner A. Bolles, Clerk 

Interest earned in 1978 $ 366.61 

Balance of account, 12/31/78 $ 7,649.85 



FEOFFEESOF THE GRAMMAR SCHOOL 
IPSWICH, MASSACHUSETTS 



Financial Statement 



Balance, January 1, 1978 
Cash Recieved 1978 

Expenditures 

Balance, December 31, 1978 



252.34 

138,648.30 

138,900.64 

135,503.08 

3,397.56 



Little Neck, Valued at 
Store Building 
Barn 
Wharf 

Cash in First Nat ' 1 Bank, Ipswich 
On Deposit Ipswich Savings Bank 
Interest 1978 

On Deposit Ipswich Savings Bank-Farm a/c 
Interest 1978 

On Deposit Ipswich Savings Bank- 
Special Notice Account 
Interest 1978 

On Deposit Ipswich Co-op Bank 
Interest and Dividends 



117 Sh 1st Nat. Boston Corp. 
140 Sh Shawmat Ass'n Corp. 
Ipswich Co-op Bank paid-up 
Certificate 



Cost 

2,748.18 
2,748.63 

2,000.00 
7,496.81 



21,328.59 
1,247.55 

6,634.72 
355.80 



4,105.36 
241,67 

8,695.38 
589.95 

Present 
Value 

5,817.24 
5,782.00 

2,000.00 



$ 97,500.00 
4,600.00 
1,090.00 
1,019.00 
3,397.56 



22,576.64 
6,990.52 

4,347.03 
9,285.33 



13,599.24 



$164,405.32 



The following taxes were paid to the Town of Ipswich: 
Assessed Value 



Land 

Store 

Barn 

Wharf 

Cottages 



97,500.00 

4,600.00 

1,090.00 

1,019.00 

1,128,090.00 

1,232,299.00 



7,361.25 

347.30 

82.30 

76.93 

85,117.54 

92,985.32 



Exhibit A 



Reconciliation of Cash Balance 



December 31, 1978 



Balance, January 1, 1978 $ 252.34 

Cash Reciepts, Schedule I 138,6 48.30 

138,900.54" 

Expenditures, Schedule II 135,503.08 

Balance, December 31, 1978 3,397.56 



Outstanding Accounts 



December 31, 1S78 



1972 $ 306.40 

1973 552.23 

1974 517.15 

1975 536.51 

1976 2,072.08 

1977 4,864.34 

1978 11,487.41* 

20,336.12 

* $2,342.70 has been paid since January 1, 1979, leaving a 
balance of $9,144.71 outstanding for 1978. 



Schedule I 

Cash Reciepts 
January 1 - D2ce<»"oer 3~ 



Collections: 



Rent and Land 7_ j .vr::.T: 

Taxes 83,034.12 

Interes: on Late Payae^? 



Transferred fro- Savings 25,000.00 

Miscellaneous payments 301.20 

Little Heck 1 = s a : i a 1 1 : a - Re imo .• ■« n t 

of Electric Payment 148.84 

Dividends: 



First Rational Boston Corp. S445.9-1 

Sha-srm-.it Association, Inc. 259.00 705 



$138. 648.30 



Schedule II 
Expenditure s 
January 1 - December 31, 1978 

Taxes: 

Town of Ipswich $92,985.32 

" " Water Liens 475.00 

Director of Internal Revenue 144.00 

93,604.32 

Transfer to Savings 28,000.00 

Repairs: 

Roads $ 727.59 

Wharf 193.79 

Tree work 1,492.75 

Playground 457.47 

Miscellaneous l,o60. 81 

3,932.41 

New work: 

Float 2,471.84 

Salaries and Expenses: 

Salaries $2,382.24 

Transportation 1,800.00 

Meetings and Dinner 155.60 

Office Supplies and Postage 82.00 

Telephone 250.83 

Rental Safe Deposit Box 13.00 

4,683.67 

Police 1,424.00 

Insurance and Bond 1,238.00 

Town of Ipswich - Reimbursed by Little 

Neck Association 148.84 



$135,503.08 



Note: Donation to Town of Ipswich for support of Schools 
in the amount of $7,500.00 was made in February 1979. 



Monies collected for FY78 are as follows: 



Interment Openings 


$6,305 


Chapel Tent Rentals 


450 


New lots and graves perpetual care 


2,800 


New lots and graves purchased 


1,750 


Perpetual Flower Fund Deposit 


200 


Annual Care Income 


274 


Monument foundations 




and lot bounds set 


924 



$12,703 
(Perpetual Care & Flower Income not known as of this report. 



CIVIL DEFENSE 

John R. Harrigan, Director 
Robert O'Meara, Assistant Director 

Emergency Readiness, or Disaster Preparedness, means that a jurisdiction 
is prepared to respond promptly to save lives and protect property, if it is 
threatened or hit by an emergency of any type; utilizing all available resources. 
This requires that planning be done and preparedness actions be taken before 
the emergency. 

Civil Preparedness has been called "Civil government acting in an extra- 
ordinary emergency" but it is more than Local government forces do to pro- 
vide the core. Many non-governmental forces and groups must also be 
involved; the operation of all these groups must be coordinated effectively 
if an emergency occurs. These groups involve the Auxiliary Police, Auxiliary 
Fire, Communication and the Search and Rescue Team. 

The need for Civil Defense was brought to its pinnacle during 1978. The 
great blizzard found the Governor declaring a State of Emergency in Mass- 
achusetts. This declaration touched in some way all residents of Ipswich. 
The Civil Defense organization in Ipswich swung into action; coordinating 
survival and clean up efforts. Department Heads, Fire, Police and Highway 
Departments were completely cooperative to Civil Defense. We take this 
opportunity to thank them for the many long hours and days put forth in 
cleaning our town. 

Volunteers! Well, you just cannot thank them enough. This includes 
Communication groups. Auxiliary Fire, Auxiliary Police and Medical people 
who donated hours of their time to put Ipswich in a Control State. 

The end of 1978 brought to close a career of a very dedicated person in the 
field of Civil Defense. I take this opportunity to express my appreciation to 
Robert O'Meara who stepped down as Assistant Director. His desire, ability 
and imagination will be missed by this office. From a friend, "thank you Bob, 
for a job well done. ' ' 

47 



COMMUTER RAIL COMMITTEE 

Leland F. Carter, Chairman 

Last year's February snow had a very bad effect on rail transportation. 
Because of the storm, many Budd cars became useless as self-propelled 
units and eventually had to be coupled semi-permanently into trains pro- 
pelled by Diesel locomotives. Many of the locomotives used had been in 
storage and minor breakdowns caused frequent delays well into the summer. 
With frequent use and the addition of several new and larger locomotives, 
rail service has become more and more reliable. Things will improve even 
more as the older locomotives are replaced with new ones. 

The use of locomotives to propel the trains has temporarily caused a 
problem to persons living near the tracks, because of noise and vibration 
from the diesel engines. This Spring the MBTA plans to install layover 
facilities in Ipswich to alleviate the problems. These facilities will allow 
the engines to be shut down during the nighttime hours. The design for 
these facilities is now in progress. 

The Ipswich Commuter Rail Advisory Committee reported to the Board 
of Selectmen that there is no viable alternative to commuter rail service, 
that all alternative means of transportation had been investigated, and that 
none were found to come anywhere near meeting the demands of public 
convenience and necessity as well as rail service. 



COUNCIL ON AGING 

Betty Pelham, Chairperson 

In this, its second year, the Council on Aging has shown a steady growth 
in its efficiency and effectiveness. 

The analysis of the Council's survey of 1500-1600 elderly citizens of the 
town showed transportation to be a major problem of concern. The van 
sponsored by Senior Home Care has proved to be a great step in solving 
this situation. 

This fall the Council held a free rectal cancer screening clinic at the 
Drop-In Center under the auspices of the American Cancer Society in which 
100 citizens participated. The free Tuesday morning (10:30-12:00 noon) 
blood pressure clinic conducted by Mrs. Carmen Hebbel, R.N., is still in 
effect, with a noticeable increase in citizens receiving this service. 

We also display the beautiful handiwork of many of our elderly citizens 
in our windows. 

Birthday parties are held each month at the Center and our lending 
library (magazines as well as books) is proving successful. 

Last winter the Council provided emergency fuel assistance information 
as well as employment assistance, which proved beneficial to the many 
residents who requested aid. 

48 



The staff, furnished by Senior Community Service Employment Program 
and paid by this program, is on duty from nine to five Monday through 
Friday. 

Currently the Council on Aging is working toward the establishment 
of two spaces for the handicapped at the Ipswich Shopping Center. Also 
free income tax assistance will be given at Council Headquarters during 
tax time. 



DOG AND ANIMAL CONTROL 

Melvin Blaquiere, Officer 

During this past year I worked with a student from Project Open on 
Wednesdays for 21/2 hours a week. Another High School student from Action 
of Gloucester was with me for the summer months. 

This past year the residents seemed to cooperate with the leash law a 
little better, and called for more assistance than in previous years. Most 
people were aware of the Dog Officer's presence around town. 

As Animal Control Officer my duties have included all types of animal 
calls, annual barn inspections, and the inspection of all farm animals 
imported into the Town from other states. These were done under instructions 
from the State Department of Health Animal Control. 

ANNUAL STATISTICS 



Dogs picked up 


256 


Dogs returned to owners 


204 


Dogs sold 


14 


Dogs destroyed 


38 


Complaints answered 


750 



49 



ELECTRIC DEPARTMENT 

Robert D. O'Meara, Manager 

OFFICE — 222 High Street, Hours 8:00 A.M. -4:00 P.M. Tel. 356-4331, 
4332. Emergency calls niehts, Saturdays, Sundavs and Holidays call Power 
Plant 356-3600. 

The year 1978 was highlighted by two occurences significant to the 
Municipal Electric Department. First we marked the 75th anniversary of the 
Department. Second Mr. Alfred L. Tobiasz retired as Manager after de- 
voting 40 years of service. His actions developed this Department into the 
modern and progressive unit we have today. 

MAJOR CONSTRUCTION PROPOSED 1979 

1. Install 25 KV spacer cable along Locust Street, Town Farm Road and 
Fowlers Lane. 

2. Install a new three phase underground system to provide power to the 
Essex Road well site. 

CONSTRUCTION COMPLETED IN 1978 

1. A new three phase underground distribution system was installed to 
"Agawam Village" the new housing units constructed by the Ipswich 
Housing Authority. 

2. A 23000 volt transfer switch was installed in sub-station #4. 

3. Spacer cable was installed along Mitchell Road and Avery Street. 

4. 2 streetlighting fixtures, 7 new overhead and 3 underground services, 5 
new poles, 8940 feet of overhead wire, 4730 feet of underground wire and 
577 KVA of transformers were added to the system. 

MAINTENANCE 

26 overhead and 5 underground services, 37 poles and 12 streetlights were 
replaced. Maintenance at the Generating Plant was carried out by the Power 
Plant personnel and all nine units are in good operating condition. 

STATISTICS 
POWER GENERATED & PURCHASED 



1977 1978 

Generated 1,122,050 1,398,930 

Purchased 65,061,922 66,952,023 

Total KWH 66,183,972 68,350,953 

This represents an increase of 3.27% in power usage as compared to 1977. 



50 



ESSEX COUNTY 
MOSQUITO CONTROL PROJECT 

Robert W. Spencer, Superintendent 

The Essex County Mosquito Control Project on July 12, 1978 completed 
thirteen years of service to the Town of Ipswich and twenty-one other 
Essex County communities. 

While there are those who will disagree, much has been accomplished 
since 1965 in abating the mosquito both as a biting nuisance and a public 
health hazard. The program of source reduction through drainage and water 
management and the annual treatment of chronic mosquito breeding plots 
have greatly reduced the numbers of mosquitoes emerging from fresh water 
wetlands, noticeably lessening the early summer problem. 

The coastal salt marshes continue as the greatest mosquito breeding 
potential along the North Shore because of the many miles of neglected 
mosquito ditches originally installed during the days of the * 'Great De- 
pression." Since 1967 a total of 624,400 feet or 118 miles of salt marsh 
ditching has been reclaimed. Ten years ago the salt marsh mosquito was a 
severe nuisance for the entire summer. In 1978 there were but two heavy 
broods to emerge from the marshes, both associated with periods of ab- 
normally high tides. 

A major improvement in the method of spraying for adult mosquitoes was 
the ULV application adopted two years ago. The application of technical 
grade insecticide in a much reduced dosage has resulted in greater coverage 
with less material, with the added benefit of a more effective application 
at less cost per acre. 

In April and early May 54 acres of mosquito breeding plots in Ipswich 
were treated with Abate at the rate of 1 fluid once per acre. 

The prehatch or winter ice-dusting program was impractical in 1978 be- 
cause of exceptionally heavy and persistent snow cover. 

During August, employing specially designed equipment, the project crews 
reclaimed 200 feet of Saltonstall Brook between the DPW garage and the 
VFW hall. In September 580 feet of Kimball Brook was reclaimed in the 
Safford Avenue-Center Street area. 

The Project spray truck assigned to Ipswich was at work in the town 
on: June 2, 6, 13, 16, 20, 23, 27, 30. July 7, 11, 14, 21, 24, 28. August 4, 11, 
18,22,25. September 1. 

The trapping method of abating the Greenhead Fly has been employed 
now for 12 consecutive years with a total of 600 box traps installed annually 
on the salt marshes of seven coastal communities. The nuisance caused 
by these pests continues on the decline. 



51 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 

Melvin A. Bo wen, Chief 

There were no major fires during the past year. 

All members of the Permanent and Call Department have successfully 
completed the First Responder Course, which is required by State Law. 

Engine 4, a forestry and rescue truck was delivered in January. This truck 
carries the "JAws of Life" which was used twelve times during the year to 
extricate victims of Motor Vehicle accidents. 

Chief Mozdziez retired in January, after 27 years of dedicated service to 
the Town. 

We were all saddened by the death of Captain Sam Chouinard on June 6. 

These two men were never replaced; therefore, there is a reduction in the 
permanent department of two positions. I sincerely believe that these jobs 
should be filled for the safety of the public. 

The present personnel complement consists of: 

Permanent Force: 
3 Captains 
12 Firefighters 

Call Force: 

2 Lieutenants 
25 Firefighters 

The department responded to 56 Bell Alarms and 325 Still Alarms during 
the last year. 



GOVERNMENT STUDY COMMITTEE 

Boley S. Radzinski, Chairman 

1978 has been most active for the Government Study Committee. 

The Committee organized on July 10, 1978 and elected Mr. Boley S. 
Radzinski Chairman, and Mrs. Jessie Girard Secretary. 

The Committee met ten times and discussed changes in the charter as 
mandated by the Board of Selectmen. All six changes have been submitted 
to the Board of Selectmen for their consideration. The change of the Annual 
Town Meeting and Town election has already been voted on at a Special 
Town Meeting and will go into effect in April, 1979. 

A principal goal of the Government Study Committee is to work closely 
with the Board of Selectmen and review changes in the charter as mandated 
by the Board of Selectmen. 

52 



This Committee meets the first and third Thursday of each month at the 
Electric Light Building. 

We would like to thank the Town Manager, Board of Selectmen, Depart- 
ment Heads and many others who have helped the Committee this past year. 



HARBOR DEPARTMENT 

John Costopoulos, Harbormaster 

I found the year 1978 a most rewarding experience as Harbormaster for 
the Town of Ipswich. I have to thank the Town Manager's Office, Police, 
Public Works and Electric Departments for their help and cooperation in 
helping me to better understand my job. 

I also want to thank all boat owners for their cooperation for obeying the 
rules and regulations; and the many people who care for helping me keep 
the Town Wharf clean. 

Except for two minor incidents on skis, it was a very good season. 

This office did its best on markers and buoys and above all, problems were 
solved and communication with the townspeople appeared to be effective. 

I hope this coming year will be as good as last. 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT 

Deborah Johnson Stone, Agent 

1978 has been a year of transition and reorganization for the Health 
Department. The Department, which has been functioning on a part-time 
basis since July 1978, has been developing Rules and Regulations and 
standard operation procedures in addition to the enforcement of public 
health codes under the direction of the Board of Health. 

Basic areas of code enforcement include restaurant sanitation, minimum 
standards for housing, licensure of camps and motels, public pool and beach 
sanitation, communicable disease control, public health nuisance control, 
construction and repair of septic systems and land use testing. 

The department also conducts various clinics each year and maintains a 
biologic depot which supplies many vaccines to local physicians, clinics 
and the hospital. 

The rubbish collection service is administered by the Health Department. 
Four bags or barrels of mixed trash and garbage are collected once weekly 
from all residences. Multi-family dwellings may place 8 bags at the curb. 
Annual holidays for curbside collection are listed below: 



53 



Memorial Day Last Monday in May 

Independence Day July 4 

Labor Day First Monday in September 

Thanksgiving Last Thursday in November 

Christmas December 25 

New Year's Day January 1 

During these holiday weeks, collections will be made the day after the 
normal pick up day, including Saturdays. 

The Transfer Station on Town Farm Road is available to residents for 
the deposit of excess bagged trash. The Station also provides bins for the 
deposit of glass (sorted by color), cans, flat paper & Newspaper and corrugat- 
ed cardboard for recycling. An area at the Station is also designted for the 
salvage of metal applicances and scrap metal (no auto's or engines please). 
A permit for the use of the Transfer Station is available to residents from the 
Health Department. 

Land use testing (percolation and ground water) is performed only during 
the months of March and April. A total of 84 tests were conducted during 
the testing period of 1978 with a failure rate of 14%. 

A rabies clinic was conducted for dogs and cats in which 300 animals 
were vaccinated. Several influenza clinics were conducted by the department 
with approximately 300 elderly participating. Fifty Seven Food Service 
Permits were issued by the Board of Health. 137 Plumbing and 115 Gas 
permits were issued and 38 Disposal Works Permits were given for repair or 
construction of septic systems. 

The Board of Health meets on the evening of the second Thursday of 
each month. 



HISTORICAL COMMISSION 

John Conley, Chairman 

In the fall of 1977, the Town received a second Community Development 
Block Grant, this one for the amount of $185,000. Of this sum, $100,000 
was granted to continue the work of preservation and rehabilitation, while 
the amount of $85,000 was earmarked for improvements in the South Parish 
House. Because of the tragic destruction of that building by fire, the 
Commission sought permission to transfer those funds to the continuation 
of the Housing Rehabilitation program and received approval for the change 
in the summer of 1978. 

To date, the program has provided loan subsidies and direct grants to 
forty-nine low-and moderate-income homeowners in the central part of Town 
to assist in the rehabilitation of their homes. Since many of the homes were 
significant because of age or architectural features, the Commission believes 
that both goals of preservation and rehabilitation were accomplished. The 
owners of a number of these historic houses have entered into Preservation 
Agreements with the Commission. 

54 



Frank Houde was the very competent director of the program until his 
resignation last spring. He has been succeeded by Edward Zimmer who has 
continued the same kind of tactful, resourceful and knowledgeable manage- 
ment of the program. 

Three projects, funded chiefly by the Massachusetts Historical Commission 
are greatly adding to the wealth of historical information about the Town. 
The first is the inventory of the historic houses of the Town which is the 
first step in the process of identification of a number of areas to be nominated 
to the National Register in the coming year. This is being carried on by Edward 
Zimmer and Margaret Weldon. The second project is an inventory of 17th 
century sites and is being researched by Ellen Savulis. The third is an inven- 
tory of archeological sites and is being done by Victoria Kenyon and David 
Lacey. 

The Commission has continued with the performance of its regular duties 
of maintaining the plaques for the historic houses and of filling orders for 
its publication, "Something to Preserve." 




HOUSING AUTHORITY 

Arthur Goodfellow, Chairman 
Jane Bokron, Director 

The Ipswich Housing Authority currently administers three (3) projects: 
VETERAN'S PROJECT 24 units.... CAROLINE AVENUE, 100 Elderly 
Units.... SOUTHERN MANOR, 20 Elderly Units. 



55 



It is anticipated that early in 1979 80 Elderly Units and 14 Family Units 
will be ready for occupancy at AGAWAM VILLAGE (Off County Road). 
These 94 units will go from the development to administrative once these 
units are occupied. 

JOHN THATCHER, JR.: After 16 years as a Board Member of this 
Authority, John Thatcher chose not to run for office in 1978. Fifty two 
guests honored John at the 60 Newbury Restaurant to thank him for his 
dedicated service above and beyond the call of duty. Chairman Arthur 
Goodfellow is shown presenting a barometer/thermometer to John Thatcher. 

AGAWAM VILLAGE — NEW CONSTRUCTION: This Project has 80 
Elderly Units of which 72 units are conventional and 8 are for elderly 
handicapped. The 14 Family unts consist of four 2 bedrooms, seven 3 bed- 
rooms, two 4 bedrooms and one 3 bedroom handicapped unit. All units 
are electrically controlled and occupancy is scheduled for early in 1979. 

VETERAN'S HOUSING — PROJECT 200-1: These 24 family units 
built in 1950 consist of two 4 bedrooms, eight 3 bedrooms, fourteen 2 
bedrooms. Each unit has a gas stove, gas furnace, two smoke detectors, 
fire extinguisher. 21 of the 24 units have been completely painted with scrub- 
bable semi-gloss paint. Formica has been installed around the bathtub area 
and behind the stoves. All units have safety chain locks on interior doors. 
New electrical fixtures are being installed over cellar stairways. This past 
year all gas furnaces were double inspected by professionals. New roadways, 
new street lights, new parking spaces were incorporated with AGAWAM 
VILLAGE. Complete project of seven buildings is scheduled to be re-sided 
in pre-stained red cedar shingles early in 1979. Average shelter rent is 
$85.00 per month. 

SOUTHERN MANOR — ELDERLY PROJECT 667-C2: These 20 units 
built in 1957 are heated by gas. Each unit has a gas stove, gas furnace and 
refrigerator. All utilities are paid by the Authority. 12 of the 20 units have 
been completely painted in scrubbable semi-gloss paint. Emergency alarms 
system have been installed in 13 of the 20 units. All units have a smoke 
detector, fire extinguisher, sewerage system has been connected to municipal 
sewer system, new exterior lights have been installed at each cellar stairway. 
New roadways, new street lights, new parking spaces have been incorporat- 
ed with AGAWAM VILLAGE. Average shelter rent is $71.00 per month and 
average age is 78 years young. 

CAROLINE AVENUE — ELDERLY PROJECT 667-C2: These 100 
electrically controlled units were built in 1968. 40 of the 100 have been 
completely repainted in scrubbable semi-gloss paint. Smoke Detectors, key 
keepers and intercom system was installed for better security. Sump pumps 
were installed after the Blizzard of 78. Rubber stair treads installed on all 
back stairways. Average shelter rent is $74.00 per month. Average age is 
77 years young. 

RENT SUBSIDY PROJECT 707: These 80 Rent Subsidy units provide 
subsidies for low income families, including elderly and disabled persons. 
It allows the Authority to rent privately owned apartments and pay a rent 
supplement to make up the difference in the agreed total monthly rent. 
This program has helped landlords and tenants improve conditions in their 
apartments and blighted areas. Department of Community Affairs of The 



56 



Commonwealth of Massachusetts has allocated an annual sum of $103,789.00 
to be paid to landlords. Average Rent Subsidy rent tenants paid to land- 
lords was $79.00 per month. Average Rent Subsidy the Authority paid to 
landlords was $1 10.00 per month for 1 , 2, 3 and 4 bedroom apartments. 

HOT LUNCH PROGRAM: This highly successful congregate dining pro- 
gram was started February 25, 1975. There are 70 meals served daily in the 
Recreation Hall for many elderly persons in this Commonwealth. Approx- 
imately 35 meals daily for the Meals on Wheels Program are delivered 
from this site. 

MINI — BUS: This 13 passenger Mini-Bus is used to transport the elderly 
and disabled persons to local shopping areas and the hot lunch program. 

DEATHS: There were 7 deaths in the elderly projects during 1978. To 
their families we extend our most sincere sympathy. 



INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT 
COMMISSION 

Paul R. Beswick, Chairman 

1978 was another year of progress towards broadening the town tax base 
and combating unemployment through planned Industrial Development. 

The principle activity for the Industrial Development Commission during 
1978 has centered on the proposed Industrial Park Site, located on the north 
side of High Street and West of the Boston and Maine tracks. This site is 
accessible by way of Mitchell Road. In 1976 this site was studied with funds 
granted by FmHA through the office of OEDC in Gloucester. The study 
has shown this site to be feasible. Copies of the Proposed Industrial Park 
Study are available at the Town Library. During 1977, the Town of Ipswich, 
via the agency of the Industrial Development Commission, has applied for 
additional funds in order to further pursue the establishment of this Industrial 
Park. 

The Industrial Development Commission and the Ipswich Bay Economic 
Development Company, a private non-profit group of local citizens that 
qualify as an LDC (Local Development Corporation as defined by the Small 
Business Association) are working very closely together at this time. The 
purpose of these joint sessions has been to develop the mechanism to obtain 
initial financing to begin land acquisition and park development. At this 
writing reports show that the initial financing can be obtained through the 
LDC and a $100,000.00 Grant/Loan from Farmers Home Administration. 
The FmHA money is a grant if used for public development and a loan if 
used to buy land that is sold to private industries. In that event a pro-rata 
portion of the sale price must be repaid to FmHA as each lot(s) are sold, 
until the $100,000.00 is repaid. 

This commission continues to see its role as attracting and developing 
non-polluting, light industry in order to support the tax base and create 
jobs while at the same time maintaining the character, historical significance 
and tradition of the Town. 

57 



1978 has been another year of progress for Industrial Development in 
Ipswich. In the next few years it appears that the Park Development will 
proceed as planned. Also the Industrial Development Commission will 
continue to encourage, support and develop business and industry in the 
community. 



POLICE DEPARTMENT 

Armand R. Bouillette, Chief 

The Department is manned by 21 full time officers and a full time clerk. 
We dispatch the Animal Control Officer who is on our radio frequency. 

The police were dispatched to 10,600 calls of a criminal or police nature, 
and made 858 arrests and prosecutions in court, 55 of which were found not 
guilty. The court cases generated some $25,200. in fines and officers issued 
parking tickets which returned $3,343. There were also 85 cases of pro- 
tective custody. 

I am pleased to report that crime has been reduced by 16.3% from last 
year and our clearance rate of indexed crime as of September is 18.9% as 
opposed to 13.8% average for the 34 cities and towns of Essex County. These 
figures make Ipswich the ninth most successful police department in clear- 
ence rate of the County. We have a long way to go, but the axion "Crime does 
not pay" may become a reality here. This is our goal. 

We have achieved this high rating even though we are undermanned by 
state standards. We average 1.8 employees per thousand population as op- 
posed to 2.5 for the rest of the state. 

The department will be faced shortly with an expenditure for a new base 
radio. On Christmas Eve we had a fire in our tube set which is approximately 
18 years old and we were without a radio for 3 days. We are presently negotiat- 
ing for a county-wide radio system with the capabilities of communicating 
from station to station and car to car with any one in the 34 cities and towns. 

Our problem continues to be lack of adequate space and no garaging for 
any of the four police vehicles. 



POLICE STATION STUDY COMMITTEE 

George Mathey, Chairman 

Our report at this time last year ended with the statement that "If all 
goes well, our Police Department will, by this time next year, be located 
in quarters which are finally in keeping with its excellent performance." 
Unfortunately, all did no( go well with our efforts to provide adequate 
facilities in a remodeled Town Hall Annex for the Police Department. 

An excellent architectural firm, DiNisco Associates, was retained for 
this work, and, since the Town Hall had to be remodeled to house those 
functions presently located in the Annex, another firm was hired by the 
Town Manager for that project. Shortly before the May 1978 Town Meet- 

58 



ing, it became apparent that the Committee had underestimated the cost 
of remodeling the Annex, principally because of greater inflation and expen- 
sive facilities for the handicapped required by the State. As a result, the 
Annual Town Meeting was asked for and approved an additional $1 10,000 
for a total of about $205,000. Although the Town Hall renovations were 
not originally a part of its responsibility and although it did not have any 
control over that budget, the Committee recognized that both projects 
were inextricably interwoven, assumed responsibility without authority over 
that project and agreed to bid both jobs at the same time. In October 1978, 
after paring the Annex work down to a minimum, bids were received which 
exceeded the amounts available by $11,117 (6.2% over) for the Annex and 
$40,737 (60.9% over) for the Town Hall. 

The Committee agreed that although it was possible to cut the scope of 
the work on the Annex to match funds available, such cuts would produce a 
station no better than the present one. It also agreed that it was impossible 
to cut enough from the Town Hall work without seriously jeopardizing the 
performance and morale of other town departments. Therefore, it voted 
unanimously to recommend that the Selectmen reject all bids and that the 
project be rebid in time for the 1979 Annual Town Meeting. In that way 
actual bid prices would be known and the correct amount requested of the 
voters. 

As of this writing (12 February 1979), the Committee is anticipating 
meeting with the Selectmen to discuss future steps. 

In the meantime, as the police facilities get older, the need for adequate 
facilities continues to become more and more urgent and necessary and 
construction costs continue to escalate. 



PUBLIC LIBRARY 

Eleanor M. Crowley, Librarian 

A review of Public Library activity for the year 1978 shows over-all circula- 
tion to be up 1.2% over the previous year. A total of 101,433 items were 
borrowed for an average of 8.8 books per resident, a figure which ranks 
Ipswich above the average for its population group. 

Further examination of 1978 statistics reveals that reference transactions — 
questions answered, information gathered and assistance rendered — were 
up .03%: 23,767 total transactions. The library issued 671 library cards to 
new borrowers. Attendance figures reveal that fewer people than in 1977 
(37,763) appear to be utilizing more of the facility and its resources. 

By exercising extraordinary economies in acquisitions, the library added 
3,407 volumes to the collection — an increase of 7% over 1977. At the same 
time 2,226 dated or inactive volumes were withdrawn, for a net increase to 
the collection of 1,181. Total volumes now number 59,958. An on-going 
evaluation of the collection is expected to result in substantial moderniza- 
tion of the book stock. 

A book leasing plan was introduced to relieve the problem of long waiting 
periods for books in high demand — the best sellers. The result of leasing 

59 



multiple copies of best sellers has been to improve delivery to the borrower, 
reduce paperwork, and create a lesser burden on the Library's already limit- 
ed shelf space. 

The Library was the recipient of a $2,000 Federal Grant for the purpose of 
improving its Inter-library Loan Reference capabilities. Numerous reference 
volumes were purchased, as well as microfilmed periodicals. Our participa- 
tion in the Eastern Massachusetts Regional Library System continues to 
enable us to bring to residents of Ipswich the resources of its member libraries 
including films, cassettes, records and books. 

Through the generosity of the Friends of the Library, the Children's Room 
has benefitted from the addition of a study carrell, tape recorder and head- 
phones. In addition, the Friends underwrote the production costs of the 
Public Library Services Brochure entitled "What's in it For Me?", as well 
as continuing their many suportive efforts in Children's and Adult pro- 
gramming. 

The closing months of 1978 also saw the germination of the idea of 
establishing a Library Planning Committee, a group of citizens whose function 
will be to evaluate existing facilities and make recommendations for future 
needs. 

Resignations from the Board of Trustees were tendered by Daniel W. Poor 
who served the Library faithfully for many years, and by Reverend Robert 
Dobson, a valued member of the Board for seven years. 



PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT 

Armand T. Michaud, Director 

The Public Works Department is a merger of the following divisions: 
Public Works Administration; Highway; Forestry; Equipment Maintenance; 
Town Hall/Annex and Municipal Garage Building Maintenance; Snow and 
Ice Control. Each division is charged with particular responsibilities relating 
to its duties. When additional manpower is required to perform specific 
tasks, personnel are interchanged within the divisions. 

Provided below is a summation of projects undertaken by the individual 
divisions of the Public Works Department. 

HIGHWAY DIVISION 

Norman Stone, Foreman 

Street sweeping was done twice a week from March to November. All 
Town roads were swept in the spring to rid them of winter sand deposits. 

Approximately 340 tons of cold patch were purchased for repairs to the 
streets. 

Crosswalks, parking spaces and traffic lines were painted in the business 
area. 



60 



Traffic and street signs were installed, replaced and repaired around town. 

Markers were installed at 500 fire hydrants to insure that they are promptly 
located and shoveled out after snow storms. 

Curbing was installed on 350 ft. of Washington St. and 400 ft. of So. Main 
St. 

A total of 540 catch basins were cleaned by private contract. 

A total of 90,910 ft. of traffic lines were painted on Argilla Rd., Central 
St., County St., East St., High St., Linebrook Rd., Market St., Mill Rd., 
No. Gate Rd., No. Main St., So. Main St., Topsfield Rd. and at the Town 
Hall parking lot off Elm St. by private contract. 

A bituminous wearing surface was applied on the following roadways: 
Central St., Charlotte Rd., 2,500 ft. of Linebrook Rd. (from Newbury Rd. 
to Boxford Rd.), 2,200 ft. on Chapter 90 Linebrook Rd., Mineral St., Ran- 
dall Rd., Washington St., intersection of County St. and East St. and at the 
Topsfield Rd. railroad crossing. 

A surface treatment, consisting of oil, stone and sand mixture, was applied 
on the following roadways as part of a continuing maintenance project: 
Boxford Rd., East St. #2, upper Linebrook Rd. and Newbury Rd. 

In addition to 20 catch basins being rebuilt, seven new catch basins were 
installed. 

Shoulders were graded on Boxford Rd., Jeffrey's Neck Rd., Linebrook 
Rd., Mineral St., Old Right Rd., Plains Rd., Topsfield Rd., Washington 
St. and Water St. 

Drainage problems were corrected on Boxford Rd., Capeview Rd., Line- 
brook Rd. and Town Farm Rd. 

Sidewalks were installed on Brownville Ave., High St., Liberty St., Miner- 
al St., Mt. Pleasant Ave. and Washington St. 

New guard rails were installed on Labor-In-Vain Rd. 



FORESTRY DIVISION 

Charles Foley, Foreman 

The alleviation of the Dutch Elm Disease has once again been the prime 
concern of the Forestry Division. Over 200 Dutch Elm trees or beetle infested 
trees were removed during the year. 

Injection treatments of Lignasan BLP were administered to 39 elm trees to 
kill fungus. This process has worked successfully for the past four years. 

All areas of town underwent a 10-week period of mosquito spraying. 
Trucks were sent out three times each week in an effort to combat the heavy 
broods of mosquitos. 



61 



Arbor Day ceremonies took place on April 28th during which 500 Black 
Walnut trees were distributed to each first grader to take home, plant and 
care for. 

The Forestry Division also planted 130 trees, including maple, locust, 
scarlet oak, pear, evergreen, beech, dogwood and crabapple trees. 

The chemical "Krenite" was sprayed along four miles of roadsides to aid 
in the killing of brush. 

Other work consisted of trimming and pruning trees, removing hanging 
limbs, cutting brush, mowing roadsides, setting up voting booths for elections 
and setting up for the annual Town Meeting. 

EQUIPMENT MAINTENANCE DIVISION 

John McParland, Mechanic 

All Public Works' vehicles are serviced and repaired at the Municipal 
Garage. At present there are 30 pieces of motorized equipment that must 
be kept in good operating condition to insure its availability when needed. 
Operational cost records showing maintenance and gas/oil expenses on each 
vehicle can be ascertained from the Public Works Administration office. 

BUILDING MAINTENANCE DIVISION 

Routine maintenance and minor repairs were performed at the Town Hall, 
Annex and Municipal Garage throughout the year. 

SNOW & ICE DIVISION 

The Public Works divisions combined their efforts during the winter 
months. Work consisted of plowing roads, hauling snow, sanding/salting 
roadways, filling sand barrels, clearing catch basins and hydrants and 
answering miscellaneous complaints. Other personnel who assisted the Public 
Works crews during the height of the snow storms were from the Cemetery, 
Electric, Parks, Sewer and Water Depts. Also utilized were the services of 
20 private contractors. 

TEMPORARY HELP 

A total of 23 men from the Comprehensive Employment Training Act 
Program (CETA) have worked within the Public Works divisions at different 
intervals throughout the year. 



62 



RECREATION — PARKS DEPARTMENT 

James H. Daly, Director 

Changing times bring about new trends in summer playground activities. 
Ipswich, like most north shore communities has been faced with sharply de- 
clining playground attendances especially during the afternoon. The cause 
is obvious. The usual playground program of the past is facing stiff com- 
petition of the back yard (neighborhood) pools, inground backyard play- 
ground equipment, the self-supporting youth programs (Little League 
Baseball and Soccer), the leisure activities of skate-boarding, bicycling, 
jogging, hiking explorations, etc. The competition of Crane's Beach is 
always present. 

To meet this challenge the Recreation Department, its Director and 
Committee have turned to centralization. Thus revolutionary changes will 
take place here this summer. Supervision will be eliminated at 8 of the 9 
playgrounds and all activities will be centralized at the John S. Bialek park 
off Linebrook Road (formerly Linebrook Playground). The supervisory 
staff (leaders) will be cut to less than half, from 11 to 5. Likewise the play- 
ground hours will be cut in half. Supervision will be present from 9:00 a.m. 
to 12:00 noon only. Afternoon sessions will be eliminated. The 8 tot areas 
that are widely scattered around town will be equipped and maintained. 
Youngsters in those unsupervised areas will be bussed to and from Bialek 
Park daily Monday through Friday. Eligible youngsters will be those who 
have advanced beyond the first grade of school. Parental discretion is advised. 

At Bialek Park a diversified program of sports, arts and crafts, special 
features and field trips will be offered. These revolutionary changes will 
bring about a 50% savings in personnel costs. The changes are also intended 
to bring about a high quality program and sharply increased attendances. 

In the interests of the tax-paying public and in keeping with changing 
times, steps will be taken to make most programs partially or fully self- 
supporting. The purpose is to increase the department income and thus reduce 
the # overall costs of the department. The national trend is to assess nominal 
fees to those individuals who are participating in the programs and activities 
thus avoiding "taxation without representation' ' for the many non-partici- 
ants. 

In conjunction, beach stickers will likely go up to one dollar. Individual 
registration for Pony baseball will likely be set at $10. The cost of swim 
instructions may increase from the present $2 per individual to $5. Family 
rates may go up from the past $3 to $8 and $10. The actual cost per student 
for a ten hour week including round trip transportation is $1 1.73. It is also 
planned to assess a one dollar registration fee for all senior citizen activities 
sponsored by the Town. The urpose here is to discourage absenteeism result- 
ing in expensive empty bus seats. 

Dedication ceremonies for the re-naming of Linebrook Playground to the 
John S. Bialek Park will have taken place on April 29. Bialek, a top athlete 
in his day (baseball and hockey) was a dedicated friend to Ipswich youth. 
He was active in both Little League and Youth Hockey and served for many 
years as President of both organizations. Linebrook Playground was re-named 
in his memory in action taken at the 1978 Annual Town Meeting. 



63 



The fiscal budget for 1979-80 (July 01, 1979 to June 30, 1980) stands at 
$108,000. Of that total approximately $46,103 may be charged to Parks, 
$5,450 to maintenance of the Memorial Building, $17,000 to Youth Com- 
mission operating expenses and $39,447 to town recreation. Of the total 
$108,000 budget, $77,754 goes for salaries and wages, $1,900 for capital 
expenses and $28,346 for operating expenses. 

This coming summer your Recreation-Parks Department Director will 
coordinate with other north shore communities in bringing new programs 
to Ipswich. The North Shore Recreation Directors are meeting monthly 
to face up to the many challenges that are developing because of the changing 
times and the incidence of leisure time recreation versus structured recreation. 
For the same reasons, your Director is also attending the monthly meetings 
of the Mass. Recreation and Park Society that take place throughout the 
state. 



64 




IPSWICH SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



Left to right: 
Margot Sherwood 
Deanna Cross, Chairwoman 
Judy Mulholland 

Rear left to right: 

Thomas L. Moscarillo, D.D.S. 

Robin Abendroth 

Thomas B. Emery 

Walter J. Pojasek 



Term Expires 
1981 
1980 
1979 



1979 
1981 
1979 
1979 



65 
i 




SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS 

John H. Stella 

Our total school enrollment on October 3, 1977, was 2209, a decrease of 
117 students as compared to 2326 on October 1, 1976. This was a substantial 
drop in enrollment and it reflects itself in the K-6 levels. Our total enroll- 
ment on October 2, 1978, was 2124; a decrease of 85 students. K-6 enroll- 
ment for 1978 was 1047, a decrease of 59. 

The number of Ipswich students registered at Whittier as of October 2, 
1978, was 103. 

A major factor in decreasing enrollments has been the steadily decreasing 
birthrate to Ipswich residents, except for 1976. Another factor in the growth 
rate is the immigration of families. This shows no appreciable increase. 
New house construction shows no remarkable increase; approximately forty 
housing starts in 1977. 

Salaries for professional personnel include the contractual obligations as 
provided for in the agreement between the Ipswich School Committee and 
the Ipswich Teachers Association. 

The total amount for professional salaries including the Superintendent, 
Principals, Supervisors, and Teachers was $2,608,363 or approximately 62% 
of the 1978/79 budget. 



66 



The total amount for non-professional salaries including Secretaries, 
Custodians, Cafeteria Workers, Aides, and Crossing Guards was $455,635 
or approximately 10.8% of the 1978-1979 budget. 

Auxiliary services such as Transportation Costs, Guidance Consultant, 
Physican's services, Mental Health Membership, Insurance, Utilities, and 
Rental Costs amounted to 9% of the 1978-1979 budget. 

The amount for these three categories was $3,462,781 or 82% of the 
1978-1979 budget. 

All other costs amounted to $759,408 or approximately 18% of the 
1978-1979 budget. 

The Administration recommended and the School Committee approved 
reductions in Teachers, Custodians, Food Service employees and Nurses. 
Four full-time elementary teaching positions were reduced and six teachers 
were reduced from 100% to 40%. Two full-time cleaning positions were 
reduced. 

It appears that with declining enrollments will come further reductions in 
the teaching force for the next several years and it also appears that the phasing 
out of an elementary school will be inevitable. 

The reports from the Principals of the schools and the Supervisors list 
the accomplishments of the last year and the progress of the schools. 

I extend to the members of the School Committee my sincere apprecia- 
tion for the many hours they devote for Ipswich education. 

I extend to the Administrators, Teachers, Custodians, Secretaries, Cafeter- 
ia workers and all others, my sincere appreciation for their excellent cooper- 
ation. 

Finally, I extend to the Board of Selectmen, Town Manager, Police, 
Highway, Fire Department, and other Town Officials, my sincere apprecia- 
tion for their excellent cooperation with the schools. 



67 




SUPERVISORS 

Ipswich Public Schools 



Left to right: 

Edward McDonald, Ph.D., Director of Pupil Personnel Services 

John Barranco, Ed.D., Director of Curriculum, K-12 

C. Michael Bam ford, Acting Principal, Winthrop School 

Rear left to right: 

William Waitt, Jr., Principal, Doyon School 

Marcia Fowler, Principal, Burley and Shatswell Schools 

Joseph Rogers, Principal, Ipswich High School 

Ronald Landman, Principal, Ralph C. Whipple Memorial School 



68 



HIGH SCHOOL 

Joseph R. Rogers, Principal 

Enrollment as of October 1 , 1978 - 703. 

Our school is reflecting a greater degree of conservatism, discipline and 
structuring. Pupils are becoming more aware of their responsibilities 
and the consequence which can result from irresponsible behavior. 

A more structured program of studies has been instituted which has a 
balance of required and elective courses. The results provide our pupils with 
a varied, yet basic, program. 

A School Committee appointed Task Force will be making recommendations 
for increasing graduation requirements, which should cause pupils to take 
additional course work to accrue necessary credits for graduation. Pupils 
will have more demanding academic schedules and less in-school free time. 

Major repairs and additions to the school during the past two years include 
a new roadway, a paved walkway between the academic wings, a re-roofing 
of the entire school building by the Spring of 1979, and six new tennis courts. 

Plans for a library addition have been submitted to the School Building 
Assistance Bureau of the Massachusetts Department of Education. Our 
hope is that the citizens of Ipswich will vote positively at Town Meeting 
for this construction. The library is the resource center of any school, and 
at this time we are sadly lacking in space and volumes. 



IPSWICH HIGH SCHOOL 
GRADUATES 

Bernard Adell Nancy L. Campus 

Theodore P . Angelakis Dianne Carter 

Deborah L. Antonucci Kevin Casali 

Karen Jean Antonucci Badou M. Ceesay 

Robert A. Aponas Joseph J. Chouinard 

Stanley G. Appleton Monica J. Chouinard 

Melinda Babson John M. Clemeno 

Bonnie Lee Baldinelli Ann Cleveland 

Janice Anne Baldinelli Dustin M. Colby 

Brian Michael Barton Michael Collins 

Collette A. Beaulieu William Joseph Collins 

Barbara J . Belcher Stuart M . Colter 

Mona Anne Benoit Peter B. Constantine 

John M. Blaquiere George Randall Courage 

Donald E. Bowen, Jr. Michael Joseph DeRosa 

David Matthew Bradley Terry A. Deschenes 

David Brown Steven George Desrochers 

Peter R. Buchanan James E. Doherty 

Stephen Paul Burke Christopher James Dort 

Kathryn Ann Burns Robert Doud 

69 



Richard J. Dudzisz 
Maria Farfaras 
Toni H. Farina 
Lynne Anne Fiske 
William Thomas Fithian 
Mary Theresa Foote 
Andrew James Ford 
Robert Charles Foster 
David R. Fuller 
John Galanis 
Kathv Anne Gallant 
Paul N. Gerrish 
James C. Gifford 
Rebecca Heidi Graves 
Roy David Graves 
Gail A. Griffin 
Paul Blair Griffin 
Maryanne Guay 
Ann Elizabeth Haraden 
Linda Jean Harrington 
Kathleen Anne Harvey 
John Joseph Hopping 
David Scott Humphrey 
Scott E. Kellie 
Lisa Knakkergaard 
Susan Kollins 
Kathy Jean Krajeski 
Anne Marie Krupanski 
Mildred Marie Lafoe 
Cornelius Joseph Larrivee 
Kendall Barbara Lavoie 
Jonathan Holmes Leamy 
Paul L. Lees 
Alan C. Lemire 
Barbara Susan Lewis 
Stephen K. Lewis 
Peter W. Lezon 
Justin Mark Logan 
Karen L. Lord 
Elizabeth Edwina Lynch 
Christine Marie Mackey 
Brian K. MacWhinnie 
John F. Manning 
Catherine Markos 
William J. McCarthy, Jr. 
Catherine Dorothy McGarty 
Brian P. McGrath 
Joel Emil Meers 
James A. Messer 



David S. Migneault 
Linda Jean Mills 
Debra Morton 
Julie A. Mowatt 
Donna L. Moynahan 
Jeanne C. Nicholson 
Barbara L. Nolan 
Mary Elizabeth Ogiba 
Gregory Oliver 
Joyce A. Perusse 
Patricia E. Pickul 
Jeanne Elaine Pojasek 
Vincent E. Poirier 
Rebecca Rauscher 
Graham M. Reedy, Jr. 
Beth Ann Rice 
Christopher P. Rice 
Robert E. Riddle 
Bruce H. Robie 
John W. Ross 
Katherine Elaine Rousseau 
Daniel F. Russ 
Mary Theresa Schofield 
Lori Ann Sheppard 
Sharon Lee Sheppard 
Tammie J. Smith 
Kelley Ann Smolla 
Ann Snow 
Cynthia M. Somers 
Sam Jeffery Stantial 
Virginia Lee Stevens 
Dorothy E. Surette 
William Szydlo 
Nancy Lynn Temple 
David J. Theodosopoulos 
Marian Paula Tlumacki 
Denise M. Tremblay 
James George Tsoutsouras 
Brenda Lee Tucker 
Michael S. Tullercash 
Gayle Chere Visser 
Kathleen Anne Walsh 
David Lawrence Welsh 
Maureen Evelyn Wickstrom 
Richard E.Wilson III 
John Andrew Wisnowski 
Craig Roland Woodburn 
Lorene Ann Woodbury 
Cindy Ann Wynaught 



70 



RALPH C. WHIPPLE 
MEMORIAL SCHOOL 

Ronald Landman, Principal 

In September of the 1978-1979 school year, the Ralph C. Whipple Memorial 
School opened its doors to 176 seventh grade students and 190 eighth grade 
students for a total population of 366. Upon their arrival, the students met 
with the twenty-nine teachers with whom they would participate in an 
educational expedition during this year. 

Their program of study includes the major subjects of math, English, 
science and social studies meeting daily. Reading is also compulsory for 
each student, as is physical education and health. Art, music, home eco- 
nomics, and industrial arts are either required or elected depending on the 
student's grade level. Foreign language, French and Spanish, is the only 
true elective. Supplementing the curriculum are the mini-courses, e.g., 
ceramics, backgammon, boat-building, and math team. 

Our new academic vehicle is the federally-funded "small group' ' program. 
This allows a class of approximately ten learning-disabled students to partici- 
pate in the school's departmentalized structure. As a result, these youngsters 
feel totally involved in the mainstream and are developing a sense of self- 
worth. 

Student's participation is encouraged in the athletic programs, i.e., intra- 
murals or interscholastics. This is emphasized by the "no-cut" system which 
exists in all sports. 

If a student's interest is the outdoors, the Ipswich Environmental Civic 
Action Program (IECAP) provides an opportunity for him/her to become 
involved. Weekend canoeing and camping trips are the program's main 
activities. 

The general philosophy of the Junior High School is to facilitate the early 
adolescent's maturation process academically, emotionally, socially, and 
physically. Consistent, fair, and firm standards for students are explained 
in the "Student and Parent Guide." Faculty visibility and supervision rein- 
force their importance. In the case of unacceptable behavior of achieve- 
ment, emphasis is placed upon the student's realization of his/her respon- 
sibility and necessary corrective action. A simple definition of the goal is 
that each student realizes that positive actions have positive results. 



DOYON SCHOOL 

William E. Waitt, Jr., Principal 

Doyon School continues to serve the town well, as an efficient, modern 
school. Enrollments continue to fall as we enter our fourteenth year. In 
January 1978, 448 students were enrolled, falling to 416 by December 1978, 
resulting in the loss of one teacher at the first grade level. 



71 



ORGANIZATION 

Doyon School continues to be the only school that houses seven grades, 
Kindergarten through Grade 6, with two sections of Kindergarten and Grade 
1, three Learning Centers, and three sections of Grades 2 through 6. This 
year a federally funded pre-school program was added in September to 
provide service to children with special needs. 

PERSONNEL 

A professional staff of thirty-three full and part-time professionals pro- 
vide service to the students at Doyon. Twenty-six are tenured with three 
tenure candidates. 

A service staff of eighteen includes six kitchen employees, four teacher 
aides, thre part-time lunch aides, two full-time custodians, one part-time 
custodian, a part-time nurse and a school secretary. 

CURRICULUM 

Doyon provides a standard curriculum with emphasis placed on basic 
skills of Reading, Mathematics and the Language Arts. In addition, instruc- 
tion is provided in Science, Health, Social Studies, Physical Education, 
Vocal Music, Instrumental Music, and Art. Good citizenship skills and 
manners are also encouraged. 



WINTHROP SCHOOL 

C. Michael Bam ford, Acting Principal 

The Winthrop School is an intermediate school housing four classes of 
grade four, five classes of grade five and four classes of grade six. The end 
of the year enrollment at the Winthrop was 294 students. One half of the 
student body is bussed to school while the remainder of the students walk. 

The school day is 6 hours and 15 minutes. Class "A" lunches are pro- 
vided by the school cafeteria. 

The Winthrop School provides a standard elementary school curriculum 
and includes instruction in art, music and physical education. Instrumental 
music lessons are provided and the chorus meets twice a week. The band 
and the chorus perform at concerts twice yearly. 

Instruction for children with learning disabilities is provided in a Learning 
Center staffed by two full-time specialists and an aide. 

A Title I ESEA Project in remedial reading and mathematics provides 
for a director in each area and trained aides to assist children needing help 
in these areas. The Title I Parents Advisory Council is an active and impor- 
tant part of the project. The council meets monthly and is an active and 
interesting part of the school program. 

72 



In addition to the classroom teachers, specialists in Vocal Music, Instru- 
mental Music, Art, Physical Education conduct classes on a regularly 
scheduled basis. The Winthrop School has two full-time Learning Center 
specialists, a full-time guidance counselor, a part-time diagnostician, a 
part-time speech therapist, a part-time librarian and a consulting psy- 
chologist. A nurse, a secretary, two full-time custodians, two full-time 
cafeteria workers, a part-time cafeteria worker, a part-time cafeteria cashier 
and two part-time lunchroom aides complete the staff. 

Many of the staff members are actively engaged in post graduate work 
and in area committees and boards in various areas of education, guidance 
and environmental activities. The entire staff is involved in scheduled work- 
shops in the area of curriculum development in the various disciplines. 

Many civic, private and church groups avail themselves of the oppor- 
tunities to use our facilities and equipment after school, evenings and on 
weekends. During the entire year, including the summer, our kitchen facilities 
were used in preparing meals for our senior citizens. 





BURLEY AND 






SHATSWELL SCHOOLS 






Marcia Fowler, Principal 




ENROLLMENT 








Burley 


179 


Shatswell 


155 


K. a.m. 


21 


K. a.m. 


19 


K. p.m. 


17 


K. p.m. 


18 


Grade 1 


21 


Grade 1 


26 


Grade 1 


21 


Grade 2 


24 


Grade 2 


25 


Grade 2 


23 


Grade 2 


24 


Grade 3 


23 


Grade 3 


24 


Grade 3 


22 


Grade 3 


26 







In both schools, the self-contained classes are heterogeneously grouped. 
Reading, writing, math, listening and speaking skills continue to be stressed 
as the primary school goals. Growth in these skills is accomplished through 
individualization. Weekly specialists' lessons in physical education, art, 
music and library skills are provided. 

Various support services are available for those students who may require 
them. These services include counseling, speech therapy, occupational 
therapy, specific learning disability, tutorial help and remedial lessons in 
math and reading. 



73 



DIRECTOR OF CURRICULUM 

John B. Barranco, Ed.D. 

After a year of service as the Director of Curriculum for the Ipswich Public 
Schools, I would like to take this opportunity to reflect on some of the past 
year's events. 

I am pleased with our efforts in gaining additional monies through fed- 
eral titles to carry on programs which we might not have otherwise afford- 
ed. For example, we now have a program designed to train high school 
business students in the intricacies of operating a word processing unit. 
This unit was paid for under federal vocational educational funds which are 
to be used in aiding high school students in making career choices. Addition- 
al funds were designated for updating the culinary arts equipment at the 
junior high school and for career guidance at the high school through the use 
of a computer terminal tied in with the Massachusetts Occupational Infor- 
mation System (MOIS). 

The Task Force on Minimal Competencies, Social Promotions and 
Differentiated Diplomas, which I chair, is currently at work on analyzing 
the school curriculum in light of the forthcoming state mandated guide- 
lines. At all levels, K-12, we are working toward improved communication 
especially at those points where children change schools. This is of critical 
improtance to be sure that curriculum materials and methodologies which 
are used at one grade level are compatible with those at the next level. 

Finally, we are faced with an ever increasing problem of doing more with 
fewer resources. This has made it necessary to step up our efforts to find 
additional resources in the form of state, federal, or private foundation 
monies. 



PUPIL PERSONNEL SERVICES 

Edward H. McDonald, Ph.D., Director 

During the past four years, the Ipswich Public Schools have undergone 
a drastic decline in enrollment. This decline has led various groups in Ipswich 
to conclude that there is concomitant reduction in the number of children 
with special needs served by the Ipswich Public Schools. Statistical analysis 
reveals this assumption is incorrect. 

During the past year, there has been increased enforcement on the Fed- 
eral level of both Public Law 94-142 (An Act for the Education of all Handi- 
capped Children) and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 (non- 
discrimination toward the handicapped). Both of these laws have drastically 
increased the demand for services for the handicapped and have placed 
tremendous burdens upon the public schools including: 

1 . The public schools now must provide for educational services of 
special needs children from age 3 through 22. Indeed the Ipswich 
school system, as the agent for the Town of Ipswich, must provide 
transportation for mentally-retarded adults in certain instances. 

74 



2. Mainstreaming ~ The Law also demands that children be placed in 
the least restrictive educational program possible. This provision has 
demanded that we revamp our educational delivery package so that 
children may be placed in regular classrooms and receive special needs 
support services. This type of programming demanded under the Law 
is more expensive to provide. 

3. Public Law 94-142 has guaranteed that every child must be provided 
a public tax-supported educational program. If a child resides in a 
private residential or day-school facility, the public schools must pay 
his tuition. This has led to a very heavy increase in our tuition count 
under Chapter 766 because: 

a. Parents who were formerly paying to have their children tuitioned 
in private institutions are now conscious that it is the responsibility 
of the public schools to pay said tuitions. 

b. The State has begun a program of De-Institutionalization that takes 
severely disabled and in some instances multiply handicapped children 
out of state institutions and into community living centers. The 
costs of educating these children in many instances is thrust upon 
the local school district either directly or indirectly. 

4. There has been a great increase in the need under the Law for full 
core evaluations. Chapter 766 now mandates that every child have a 
full core evaluation at least every three years. 

The above legal requirements have severely strained the resources of the 
Pupil Personnel Services Department and its delivery of services. The Pupil 
Personnel Services Dept. is extremely conscious of the need for cost effect- 
iveness. However, the limitations placed upon us by Federal and State 
Statutes seriously strains our capacity to maintain our level of quality 
service and be cost effective. 



EMPLOYMENT CERTIFICATES 
ISSUED TO MINORS 

7/1/77-6/30/78 



Age Age 

14-16 16-18 Total 

Boys 18 28 46 

Girls 13 38 51 



75 



ENROLLMENT CHART BY 
GRADES 1974 - 1978 



Grade 



1974 



975 



976 



ENROLLMENT CHART 
OCTOBER 2, 1978 



1977 



Grade 



K 



2 3 4 5 6 



1978 



K 


191 


156 


138 


106 


114 


1 


182 


188 


175 


148 


110 


2 


194 


184 


184 


158 


156 


3 


200 


181 


174 


174 


159 


4 


197 


196 


180 


167 


175 


5 


237 


191 


183 


179 


161 


6 


224 


236 


197 


174 


172 


7 


223 


220 


225 


193 


176 


8 


201 


223 


214 


219 


190 


9 


175 


171 


174 


189 


172 


10 


180 


163 


169 


182 


187 


11 


167 


173 


144 


172 


184 


12 


177 


163 


168 


148 


168 


P.G. 




4 


1 






Sp. Ed. 


8 


5 








TOTALS 


2556 


2454 


2326 


2209 


2124 



7 8 9 10 11 12 Total 



Doyon 39 


42 


61 


63 75 


Burley 38 


42 


48 


51 


Shatswell 37 


26 


47 


45 


Winthrop 






100 


Junior High 








Senior High 








O.P.E.N. 









68 72 



93100 



176190 



172 





179 




155 




293 




366 


74 175 166 


687 


13 9 2 


24 



TOTALS 114 110 156 159175 161172 176190 172187 184 168 2124 



76 



SHELLFISH DEPARTMENT 

Charles Gianakakis, Constable 
Jeffrey Dolan, Chairman 

The year 1978 was a more productive year than expected. During the 
winter months there was a tremendous seeding over many clam flats. In 
the spring the Red Tide returned, closing the Town's flats. As summer 
approached, many summer and part-time diggers had to seek other summer 
employment. However, when the flats opened after the nine week Red 
Tide closure, the flats had ample supplies of two inch (or better) clams. 

Due to the program established by the Town to limit the number of dig- 
ging days in calibration with stock/impact monitoring of the flats, we 
experienced good clamming throughout the remainder of the summer and 
fall. Also, several flats were set aside and monitored for clam size, as the 
number of takeable clams in the spring was insufficient to warrant opening. 
Some of these areas were opened for winter digging and some remain closed 
to insure a productive future. 

In the predator control area this year, pots were set out and maintained 
by the Shellfish Constable to trap green crabs. Also, five clammers were 
employed during the Red Tide closure to assist in this project as well as 
to catch and destroy horse shoe crabs, periwinkles (Littorina irrorata) and 
moon snails (Lunatia heros). The project also entailed the raking of green 
algae off the flats in an attempt to further save our seed stock. 

Our primary efforts this year have been to establish an effective digger 
impacf monitoring program to protect and enhance the productivity for 
the next few years as well as to continue to explore new predator control 
programs and funding for such projects. However, nature remains difficult 
to deal with and constant vigilance remains our best asset. 



TOWN CLERK 

Harold G. Comeau 
Comparative Vital Statistics recorded for the past four years: 



Births 

Deaths 

Marriages 

All the births recorded (70 female, 64 male) were to Ipswich residents and 
one birth took place in Ipswich. Of the total number of deaths recorded, 
1 12 were residents (64 male, 48 female). The age of the oldest resident was 
98 years, 3 months, 13 days; the youngest, 3 months, 17 days. In 36 of the 
marriages, both parties were nonresidents and in 57 marriages, one party 
was a nonresident. 



77 



1975 


1976 


1977 


1978 


109 


128 


124 


134 


127 


115 


106 


142 


139 


127 


137 


145 



DOG LICENCES 

Males 

Females 

Spayed females 

Kennels 

Total 

CLAM PERMITS 

Resident 

Non-resident Daily 
Non-resident Yearly 
Family 
Total 



1977 


1978 


538 


463 


45 


35 


392 


356 


11 


12 


987 


866 


341 


251 


53 


27 


116 


68 


-- 


4 


510 


350 



REGISTERED VOTERS (as of December 31, 1978) 



Precinct 


Democrats 


Republicans 


Unenrolled 


Total 


I 


256 


492 


655 


1403 


II 


529 


551 


957 


2037 


III 


297 


379 


797 


1473 


IV 


509 


383 


934 


1826 


Total 


1591 


1805 


3343 


6739 



ELECTIONS (Town) 

The Annual Meeting for the election of Town Officers was held in accordance 
with the Warrant on Monday, May 8, 1978 from 10:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. The 
voting machine in Precinct I registered 635 ballots cast, in Precinct II 866, 
Precinct III 602, and in Precinct IV 889, for a total of 2992 votes cast in the 
four precincts. 



MODERATOR 


Precl 


PrecII 


PrecIII 


Prec IV 


Total 


Harold E. Shively 


507 


677 


473 


625 


2282 


Blanks 


128 


189 


129 


264 


710 


Total 


635 


866 


602 


889 


2992 


SELECTMEN 


Precl 


Prec II 


Prec III 


Prec IV 


Total 


Merle Pimentel 


307 


358 


229 


240 


1134 


Adele Robertson 


272 


284 


158 


189 


903 


Elno Auclair 


19 


43 


24 


48 


134 


JohnT. Beagan 


233 


375 


327 


393 


1328 


Arthur LeClair 


198 


332 


224 


454 


1208 


James Marr 


66 


86 


63 


124 


339 


Earl Richards 


94 


106 


53 


136 


389 


Blanks 


81 


148 


126 


194 


549 


Total 


1270 


1732 


1204 


1778 


5984 


CONSTABLE 












Jeffrey Hardy 


532 


722 


499 


685 


2438 


Blanks 


103 


144 


103 


204 


554 


Total 


635 


866 


602 


889 


2992 



78 



SCHOOL COMMUTE 



Paul Gahm 


372 


457 


295 


387 


1511 


Robert Abendroth 


380 


477 


393 


438 


1688 


Angelo Perna 


284 


420 


263 


433 


1400 


Margot Sherwood 


353 


447 


327 


436 


1563 


Blanks 


516 


795 


528 


975 


2814 


Total 


1905 


2598 


1806 


2667 


8976 


HOUSING AUTHORITY 










Jacqueline Boch 


297 


395 


262 


288 


1242 


Percy Cheverie 


162 


. 244 


173 


366 


945 


Tone Kenney 


104 


128 


75 


113 


420 


Blanks 


72 


99 


92 


122 


385 


Total 


635 


866 


602 


889 


2992 



TOWN COUNSEL 

Charles Dal ton 

1978 was a year of significant change in municipal law. The state legisla- 
ture abolished the common law doctrine of municipal immunity, thereby 
making the Town of Ipswich legally liable for the negligence of all its em- 
ployees. The injured party's recovery is limited to $100,000.00 and a pro- 
cedural framework was established. 

1978 saw only one claim brought against the Town, but future indications 
are that many claims will be filed under this statute, resulting in considerable 
potential cost to the taxpayers, in both increased insurance premiums and in 
funds to satisfy judgments. 

In addition to the usual quantity of litigation, the Town was very active in 
1978 in the land acquisition area. Among the parcels of real estate acquired 
by the Town were the Rust Garage on Linebrook Road and two large tracts 
purchased by the Conservation Commission. The Town also acquired by 
eminent domain a well site on Essex Road and took the initial procedural 
steps to acquire an additional well site on Topsfield Road. 

There was a substantial amount of criminal litigation initiated and pro- 
secuted in the Ipswich District Court as the Town attempted to enforce the 
By-law requiring all homes having town sewerage available to tie in to the 
sewer lines. Most of these cases were or will be resolved by voluntary com- 
pliance with the By-law by those homeowners affected. 



79 



TREASURER— COLLECTOR 

George C. Mourikas 

The following bills were committed from the Assessors for collection: 

Real Estate, Personal Property, Farm Animal Excise, and Motor Vehicle 
Excise. 

A schedule of receipts were rendered to the Town Accountant monthly. 

A record of Trust Fund transactions were maintained. 

All disbursements, both Town and School, were processed through this 
office, and all receipts were deposited and faithfully recorded. 



VETERANS' SERVICES 

Frank Story, Director 

I hereby submit to the residents of the Town of Ipswich this financial re- 
port from the Office of Veterans' Services. Under Chapter 115 of the General 
Laws, as amended, veterans and their dependents qualify for assistance when 
need is determined, based on the budget guidelines of the Commonwealth. 
467 cases were processed in 1978. The Town is reimbursed 50% by the State 
for all authorized expenditures under this program. Expenses for the program 
are listed in the Town Report. 

The Federal Services program represents approximately 90% of our work 
load. The local community does not share in monies received through this 
program. All benefit payments from the Federal government are made direct- 
ly to the recipient. Pensions and Compensations received, and still active, 
totaled $558,468.00. VA hospitalizations saved the Town $38,800.00. The 
Federal program represents an accrued saving of $597,268.00 to the Town. 



80 



The graph explains monies received through this department from the 
State and Federal government. The Town's share, which included all 
administrative expenses, was 10% of the total monies received by veterans 
and their dependents in the Town of Ipswich. 





100% 
Federal 


50% 

Reimbursed 

by State 


Administrative 


600,000.00 


550,000.00 


597,268.00 






500,000.00 


450,000.00 


400,000.00 


350,000.00 


300,000.00 


250,000.00 


200,000.00 


150,000.00 








100,000.00 


50,000.00 




99,314.00 




1,000.00 






17,209.00 



WATER — SEWER DEPARTMENTS 

James E. Chase, Engineer 

WATER DIVISION 

Henry Chouinard, Foreman 

For the third year in a row, as our customers are well aware, the Town ex- 
perienced a water shortage. Caused by an unexpectedly dry August and 
September, the crisis was just as unexpectedly relieved by an unusually wet 
December and January. As in the past, our neighbor, the Town of Hamilton, 
gratefully came to our aid and supplemented our needs. 

Whether or not such shortages will continue remains to be seen. The Water 
Division thinks not. The Essex Road Well complex will be on line by summer. 
The regulatory restrictions on our Winthrop Wells, brought about by the 
Department of Environmental Quality Engineering, are expected to be 
resolved and with the full addition of these sources to our supplies, the 
immediate needs of the Town are expected to be met. 

The future is another matter. It is hoped that prolonged pump testing 
and land acquisition of the promising Fellow's Road site will be approved 
by the upcoming Annual Town Meeting. If this site proves out, the Town 
will have yet another source of supply either to develop or to hold on reserve 
when needed. 



81 



As reported last year, the Federal Government has made ersthwhile efforts 
to improve on the quality of our drinking water through the Safe Drinking 
Water Act of 1974. Regrettably the Congress did not see fit to add to the 
quantity as well. Nonetheless, the problem of adequate quantity is growing. 
Something must and will be done. 





1976 


1977 


1978 


New Meters Installed: 


48 


27 


83 


Meters Replaced: 


96 


71 


98 


Services Turned Off: 


112 


104 


112 


Services Turned On: 


112 


129 


118 


New Services: 


44 


26 


23 


Services Discontinued: 


2 







Hydrants Installed: 


5 


8 




Hydrants Replaced: 





4 




New Water Mains Installed: 


1,716' 


750' 


850 


Total Length of Mains: 


391,413' 


392,163' 


393,013 


WATER SERVICES 








Metered Services: 


3,120 


3,147 


3,230 


Unmetered Services: 


131 


131 


79 


Summer Services: 


172 


172 


170 


WATER USAGE 








Dow's Reservoir 


139,374,600 


187,805,000 


216,520,000 


Brown's Well 


155,736,000 


106,441,000 


82,133,000 


Winthrop Wells 


105,247,000 


66,208,000 


43,200.000 


Mile Lane Well 


20,910,000 


21,000,000 


16,447,000 


Purchased from Hamilton 


21,925,000 


9,479,000 


9,750,000 


Total Water Usage 


449,192,000 


390,993,000 


368,050,000 



Highest Day: 6/25/76 
Highest Day: 7/06/77 
Highest Day: 7/13/78 



2,458,000 



1,895,000 



1,751,000 



SEWER DIVISION 

James Tebo, Chief Operator 

Construction of 1400 feet of sewer main on County Road between Southern 
Heights and the Cable Memorial Hospital was completed. Construction of 
1 170 feet of main was begun in the Wood's Lane-Grant Court area. 

A program to enforce its By-Law regulations in the matter of tie-in to 
Town sewers, based on availability, was instituted and continues. The 
anticipated benefit of this program will be a reclassification of the Ipswich 
River by the DEQE which hopefully will open up more areas for Shellfish 
harvesting. 



82 



Sludge disposal is fast becoming a problem. Our present disposal site 
near the Treatment Plant on Fowler's Lane will soon be exhausted. The 
problem is being addressed. There are, however, no readily available solu- 
tions that are inexpensive. This problem, like that of solid waste disposal, 
is growing and unfortunately can only continue to grow. 



1976 1977 1978 

Sewage Treated Daily 

(average gallons) 500,000 993,000 891,300 
Total Sewage Treated 

(gallons) 183,000,000 362,375,000 325,322,000 

Highest Day-3/26/78 2,324,000 

New Connections 24 40 62 

Total Connections 1,136 1,176 1,238 
Chlorine Used 

(Tons) 12.10 5.49 4.68 



WATERWAYS STUDY COMMISSION 

Robert D. Todd, Jr., Chairman 

Appointed annually by the Selectmen, the Commission has primarily 
concerned itself with studies and recommendations for the effective use 
of administration and improvement of the Ipswich Waterways for all who 
work and find recreation in the area. 

This year we have tried to enlist the help of various State and Federal 
agencies to apply available programs to the Ipswich Waterways. Mr. James 
Johnson of the Public Access Board has been very helpful and has proposed 
FY80 funds in the budget for improvement of the State boat ramp and park- 
ing facilities. We are pleading with the state to give us some priority use 
for the side casting dredge to open up the mouth of the Ipswich River which 
in addition to reducing the hazard at the inlet will alleviate the dune errosion 
behind the jetty. On a longer term basis, we are working with the Corps 
of Army Engineers for maintenance dredging of the Ipswich River; the 
dredged sand would be used to restore dunes at steep hill beach. We have 
requested restoration of the outer river buoys and a permanent marker for 
the jetty which is a growing hazard to people unfamiliar to the area. The 
February 1978 storm destroyed an enormous number of navigational aids; 
the Coast Guard, who is responsible for these aids, is hard pressed to restore 
them. 

In. anticipation of the 50% revenue afforded by Rev 581 of the Acts of 
1978 (the Lane Bill) which requires that this revenue from boat property tax 
be applied directly to the waterways and further taxes boats at their normal 
moorings or location as of July with maximum taxes as a function of age 
and size; we have recommended a harbor master budget that would provide 
for additional man-hours of coverage, required safety equipment for his 
boat, and provisions for new reuseable PVC Ipswich Waterways channel 
markers. These new markers were successfully demonstrated late last year; 
they are easily installed, do not bend under, and are highly visible day and 
night. 

83 



Currently we are seeking funds from the Coastal Zone Management 
Department to pay for a study and development of an Ipswich Waterways 
master plan. 

In principle, the Commission supports the CZM's and other efforts to 
include Ipswich Waterways in an Area of Critical Environmental Concern, 
but finds the action somewhat redundant and confusing when they say it 
will simply (hopefully) require attention and enforcement of the existing 
environmental laws. We can appreciate the Selectmen's reluctance to support 
this action; the CZM did not make it clear what additional impact and/or 
financial burden will be placed on the Town or property owners however 
worthwhile. 

The Commission meets every fourth Tuesday at the Town Hall and 
welcomes your attendance. Some of the items discussed above will need 
strong Legislative and Town support to achieve. Ways and Means (money) to 
maintain and improve Ipswich Waterways for those who use it and enjoy 
it is always a tussle — our objective is to find ways to minimize impact to 
general Town tax burden. 



YOUTH COMMISSION 

Cathleen McGinley, Director 

During the year 1978, the Ipswich Youth Commission has continued to 
offer varied and numerous programs for the teenagers of the Town. It was 
through the efforts of many dedicated citizens and the teenagers themselves, 
that the Teenage Drop In Center is fully equipped with a complete inventory 
at no cost to the taxpayers. We are extremely grateful to the Drop In Center 
Fund Committee, The Friends of Ipswich Youth and the citizens of the 
Town who assisted us in reestablishing and refurbishing the new Drop In 
Center on the second floor of the Memorial Building. The equipment, ded- 
icated through the efforts of many people, and now owned by the Town is 
as follows: 

1 stereo system with ESR speakers 

2 professional pool tables 

2 commercial pinball machines (freeplay) 
4 sofa's 

1 large leather sofa 

20 cushioned conference chairs 

1 large ventilator window fan 

3 ping pong tables 

1 19" television 

2 air hockey tables 
assorted used furniture 

Major activities the Youth Commission has been responsible for over the 
past year are as follows: 

Decorate and equip a new Drop In Center 
Delivery of Town Reports 

84 



Dances and Summer concerts 

Movies at the Drop In Center 

volleyball program 

Disco record hop & lessons 

trips to McDonalds 

trips to baseball games and Skiing 

Family Fun Run 

Assisted in the Annual Marathon 

Rent A Kid program 

1st Annual Thanksgiving Day Road Race 

The year 1978 has been a successful year and now that our facility is com- 
pletely furnished we look forward to planning new and innovative programs 
for the year 1979. 



ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS 

James Theodosopoulos, Chairman 

In 1978, the Board held thirty-four hearings on requests for variances 
and special permits, and two hearings on appeals from decisions of the Build- 
ing Inspector.* In the thirty-four hearings, twenty-four requests were granted, 
eight were denied, one was withdrawn, and one was found to be unnecessary. 
In the other two hearings, the Building Inspector's decisions were affirmed. 

Fifteen of the requests were for building additions to single family dwell- 
ings in which, generally, the side or rear yard was less than required. Ten 
were granted as special permits, four were granted as variances, and one was 
found to be permitted as a matter of right. There were five requests for 
swimming pools in which the side or rear yard was less than required; all 
were granted as special permits. The following six variance requests were 
denied: two that requested signs not permitted under the Zoning By-law; a 
request to build a dwelling on an undersized lot; a request to conduct a 
business in a residential district; a request to create a non-conforming lot; 
a request to divide a lot containing two summer dwellings into two non-con- 
forming lots. A variance request to adjust a lot line was granted. The following 
special permit requests were granted: boarding of racehorses; fine arts pro- 
gram; commercial kennel. The following special permit requests were denied: 
expand a business use in a residential district; keep a horse for family use on 
an undersized lot. 

After the Annual Town Meeting, John R. Dragoni was appointed to a 
five-year term on the Board, and John R. Verani and Robert Macklin were 
reappointed as Associate Members. At its organizational meeting, the Board 
elected James Theodosopoulos and Mary Fosdick as Chairman and Vice- 
Chairman, respectively. 



IN MEMORIAM 









Date in 








1978 








Passed 




Name 


Position Held 


Away 


1. 


Daisy Poor 


Matron 


1/08 


2. 


Alex Gallant 


Water Department 


1/12 


3. 


Edwin N. Bronk 


Accounting Office & Health Agent 


1/14 


4. 


Charles Ernest Brockh 


»_ 






bank 


Power Plant 


1/16 


5. 


John Wegzyn 


Dog Officer 


1/23 


6. 


William Barton 


Fire Department 


1/26 


7. 


Daniel Markos 


Board of Registrars 


1/28 


8. 


* Arthur Cole 


Power Plant 


2/26 


9. 


Norman MacLeod 


Industrial Commission 


3/28 


10. 


Carroll B. Hills 


Conservation Commission 


3/31 


11. 


George Taylor 


Personnel Board/Acting 
Executive Secretary/Electric Light 








Adv. Board 


4/24 


12. 


Sam Chouinard 


Fire Department 


6/06 


13. 


Everet Robishaw 


Fire Department 


6/27 


14. 


Frances Bourque 


Fire Department 


7/08 


15. 


Clarence Dupray, Sr. 


Fire & Electric Depts. 


7/25 


16. 


James Lampropoulos 


Board of Registrars 


8/14 


17. 


*Margaret Chisholm 


School Department 


8/31 


18. 


Arline Comeau 


School Department 


9/21 


19. 


Walter Lezon 


Finance Committee 


12/08 



*no picture available 





1. 




4. 




2. 



3. 



T~ •*• ■ "■ "Mini.™ ■ 




i. jT fc*% 




iM H w ^H Bp 










5. 

86 






14. 





12. 




15. 





10. 




13. 




** w 




I 



16. 




18. 



19. 



87 



IPSWICH AT A GLANCE 

Town of Ipswich, Massachusetts, Essex County 

Founded 1633 — Incorporated 1634 

6th Congressional District 

Governor: Edward J. King 

U.S. Senator: Edward M. Kennedy 

U.S. Senator: Paul E. Tsongas 

U.S. Representative: Nicholas Mavroules 

Ipswich is in the 3rd Senatorial District (State) 

State Senator: Robert C. Buell 

Ipswich is in the 2nd Essex District (County) 

Representative in General Court: Forrester A. Clark, Jr, 

County Commissioners: John McKean 

Katherine M. Donovan 

Edward H.Cahill 



Government: 

Location: 

Area: 
Geographical Center: 

Population: 
Transportation: 

Tax Rate: 



Total Assessed Value: 

Miles of Roads: 

Fire Department: 



Police Department: 



Water: 

Sewer: 

Electricity: 

Gas: 

Recreational Facilities: 



Selectmen/Town Manager Charter (State Law) — 
New England Town Meeting 
Located on Massachusetts' North Shore — 35 
Miles N.E. of Boston — Driving Time 45 minutes 
33.35 Square miles — 21,344 acres 
Pedrick House, corner of Jeffrey's Neck Road and 
Ocean Drive 
11,551(1976) 

Boston & Maine R.R. — Frequent Rail Service — 
Train time to Boston 50 min. — U.S. Route 1, 
U.S. Route 1 A — Harbor Facilities — Taxi Services 
$80.00 All homes are assessed at approximately 
65% of fair market value; revaluation project 
leading to 100% fair market value assessment is 
under way; new values will be reflected in fall 1980 
tax bills 

1978 Real Estate and Personal Property $75,487,114 
Approximately 89 

Full-time 16 firemen — 30 call personnel — equip- 
ment includes one 100' Aerial ladder truck and one 
Forestry Mini Pumper 

Full-time 21 policemen — 18 auxiliaries — 4 radio 
equipped cruisers — 1 inspector — 1 Dog Officer 
with radio equipped van 
Available to Entire Town 
Available to Part of Town 
Municipal Plant available to entire Town 
Available to 75 % of Town 

Supervised Playgrounds — Summer Swimming 
Instruction — Tennis Courts — Softball Diamonds 

— Baseball Diamonds — Public Beaches on Sea- 
shore — Ponds for Ice Skating (some are lighted) 

— 9 hole Golf Course — Boat Club — Yacht Club 

— Wildlife Sanctuary — Salt & Fresh Water Fishing 

— Movie Theatre — 16 Lane Bowling Alley — Pool 
& Billiards — Golden Age Club — Active Youth 
Commission 



88 



Zoning: 

Housing: 
Schools: 



Churches: 
Medical Facilities: 



Shopping: 



Public Library: 
Health: 

News: 
Industry: 



Protection by comprehensive zoning and planning 
regulations to insure controlled growth of resident- 
ial commercial and industrial area 
Five Projects — 318 units provided for low income 
families and Elderly Citizens 
Four Elementary Schools — Jr. High School — 
High School — Pupil/Teacher Ratio 14/1 — Special 
Classes for Retarded or Perceptually Handicapped 

— Kindergartens — Regional Vo-Tech High School 

— Comprehensive program of evening classes for 
adults 

2 Baptist — 3 Catholic — 1 Christian Science — 
1 Congregational — 1 Episcopal — 1 Greek 
Orthodox — 1 Methodist — 1 Russian Orthodox 
21 Physicians — 10 Dentists — 41 Bed Hospital 

— Psychiatric Out-Patient Program — Visiting 
Nurses — Convalescent Homes — Medical Center 

— Ambulance Service — 2 Pharmacies — 2 Vet- 
erinarians 

Downtown Business District — Shopping Center — 
Antique Shops — Apparel Stores — Auto Body & 
Supply Shops — Banks — Beauty Shops (Barber 
Shops & Hair Sytlists) — Building Supplies — 
Cleaners — Gift Shops — Grocery Stores (fruit & 
vegetable stands) — Hardware Stores — Jewelers — 
Laundromats — Pharmacies — Restaurants — 
Service Stations — Sport Shops — Variety Stores 
and others 

59,958 volume library — open 6 days a week — 
Micro filmed data — Audio/Visual Equipment 
Solid Waste Transfer Station open 5 days a week — 
Rubbish Collection Weekly — Garbage Collection 
Weekly in winter, twice in summer 
Two weekly Newspapers — Coverage in three daily 
area papers and two radio stations 
Sylvania — Four Major Shellfish Plants — Monu- 
ment Manufacturing — Several Woodworking 
Establishments 



89 




Board of Selectmen 

(left to right) John Beagan; Edwin H. Damon, Jr., Chairman; Arthur 

LeClair; John Pechilis; John Pickard. 




Department Heads' 

(left to right) Bruce Symmes, Chief Assessor; Deborah Johnson Stone, 
Health Agent; John Costopoulos, Harbormaster; Robert O'Meara, Electric 
Department Manager. 



90 



j,jU"ithf2vK.£x3iU 



■ 



IPSWICH PUBLIC LIBRARY 

illlllllll 

3 2122 00166 902 1 



TOWN DIRECTORY 

Ambulance 6-5500 

Police 6-4343 

Fire 6-4321 

(Ipswich residents dial 6 and 4 digits-all others dial 356 and 4 digits-Area Code 617) 

TOWN GOVERNMENT 

Board of Selectmen Office, Town Hall (Edwin H. Damon, Jr., Chairman) 6-2262 

Town Manager's Office, Town Hall (George E. Howe) 6-4848 

Accountant, Robert H. Leet, Town Hall Annex 6-3066 

Assessor, Bruce Symmes, Town Hall Annex 6-4010 

Building Inspector, Ralph Hebert, Town Hall Annex 6-4900 

Cemetery Superintendent, Walter H. Hulbert, Jr., Town Farm Road 6-3933 

Dog Officer, Dog Pound, Melvin Blaquiere, Fowler's Lane 6-0588 

Electric Manager, Robert D. O'Meara, Electric Light Building 6-4331 

Engineer, James E. Chase, Town Hall Annex 6-5592 

Fire Chief, Melvin Bowen, Fire Station 6-4322 

Harbormaster, John Costopoulos . . .. 6-5863 

Health Agent, Deborah Johnson Stone, Town Hall Annex 6-4900 

Librarian, Eleanor Crowler, Library 6-4646 

Police Chief, Armand Brouillette, Town Hall 6-4343 

Public Works Director, Armand Michaud, Town Hall 6-5591 

Recreation/Parks Director, James H. Daly, Memorial Building 6-3767 

Town Clerk, Harold G. Comeau, Town Hall Annex 6-4161 

Town Counsel, Charles C. Dalton 6-0106 

Treasurer/Collector, George C. Mourikas, Town Hall Annex 6-3100 

Youth Director, Cathleen McGinley, Memorial Building 6-3767 

SCHOOL SYSTEM 

School Board Chairman, Deanna S. Cross 6-5275 

School Superintendent, John H. Stella, Payne School 6-2935 

High School Principal, Joseph R. Rogers 6-3137 

Junior High School Principal, Ronald Landman 6-3535 

Burley School Principal, Marcia J. Fowler 6-2666 

Doyon School Principal, William E. Waitt, Jr 6-5506 

Shatswell School Principal, Marcia J. Fowler 6-2312 

Winthrop School Acting Principal, C. Michael Bamford 6-2976 

School Nurse 6-5507 

6-3535 

FINANCE COMMITTEE 

Chairman, Lawrence J. Pszenny 6-0596 




BOARD, COMMISSION AND COMMITTEE CHAIRMEN 

Board of Assessors, Bruce Symmes, Chief 6-4010 

Cemetery Commission, Leon B. Turner 6-2656 

Civil Defense, John R. Harrigan, Director 6-3434 

Commuter Rail Committee, Leland Carter 6-2597 

Conservation Commission, Jack Johnstone 6-5857 

Constable, Jeffrey H. Hardy 6-0690 

Council on Aging, Betty Pelham 6-0234 

Economic & Industrial Development Commission, Paul Beswick 6-5624 

Electric Advisory Board, Thomas A. Ercoline, Jr 6-5257 

Government Study Committee, Boleslof S. Radzinski 6-2461 

Board of Health, Paul J. Valcour 6-0633 

Historical Commission, John F. Conley 6-2567 



Housing Au 
Library Tr 
Mosquit 
Moderat 
Planning 





prity, Arthur Goodfellow 6-523 1 

s, Hubert A. Johnson 6-5379 

ol Committee, Alice Keenan 6-4465 

old E. Shively 6-3997 

, Roger A^JBurke . . 6-3065 

olice Station Study Committee, George Mathey 
tion & Parks Committee, John H. Morrow 

Registrars of Voters, Barbara J. Rousseau 

Shellfish Advisory Board, Jeffrey M. Dolan 

Trust Fund Commissioners, Elton B. McCausland 
Waterways Study Commission, Robert D. Todd, Jrl 

Youth Commission, Louis P. Geoffrion. .* 

Zoning Board of Appeals, James Theodosopoulos T777!\^^^^H 





MEE **Sfi§t^ 



Annual Town Election 
Annual Town Meeting 
Board of Assessors 
Board of Health 
Board of Selectmen 
Cemetery Commission 
Conservation Commission 
Council on Aging 
Economic/Indust Dev Comm. 
Finance Committee 
Historical Commission 
Housing Authority 
Library Trustees 
Planning Board 

ilion/Parks Comm. 
:hoeh 
Shellfish Advisory 
Waterways Study Comm. 
Youth Commission 
Zoning Board of Appeals 



«*L 



DAY & TIME 




2nd%fenttaf ,i i 

1st Monday in" 

Every Monday* 

2nd Thursday each month 

Every Monday 

1 st Monday each month 

1 st & 3rd Tuesday each month 

1 st WadnesdaxeacJl Qlgnth 

3rd Monday each month 

Wednesday To Be Announced 

2nd & 4th Thursday each month 

2nd Monday each month 

3rd Monday each month 

Every Tuesday 

1st Tuesday each month 

1st & 3rd Thiir||j^^raonth 

4th Tuesday each month 

2nd & 4th Wednesday each month 

3rd Thursday each month 



PLACE 

^re^toa Polling Place __~ 

High School ^ "*** 

Town Hall AjRnex * 

Health Office, Annex 

Town Hall 

Cemetery Office 

Town Hall 

Town Hall 

Electric Buildings ^ A^J ^ 

Electric Building 

Town Hall 

Comm. Bldg., Caroline Ave. 

Library 

Town Hall 

Memorial Building 

\o Be Announced 

thmn Hal 1 ■' ~^'; 

To#HaT 

Memorial Bulding 

Town Hall 




Assumes 9/25/78 Special Town Meeting Article is validated by 1979 Legislature. 







****-- 



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